Mumbai: Get ready to shell out Rs 25,000 for littering inside Film City

Jan 05, 2019, 14:35 IST | Ranjeet Jadhav

Management of studio complex has taken recent instances of poaching on its premises very seriously; Maharashtra Security Force teams formed to monitor movement of people

Mumbai: Get ready to shell out Rs 25,000 for littering inside Film City
The garbage, including empty alcohol bottles, that this reporter saw in Film City

The management of Film City has taken a serious note of the poaching incidents inside its premises. The carcasses of a female leopard and sambar were recently found, besides many snares in Film City. After a meeting with Forest Department officials, it was decided to station five teams of the Maharashtra Security Force (MSF) in Film City to monitor the movement of people. Production houses shooting films or serials will be fined R25,000 in case their personnel are found throwing garbage in the forest patches. They have also been given three days to remove dismantled sets.

A force for wildlife
A total of 5 teams (five personnel in each) have been formed, each headed by an officer from MSF and they will work towards the protection and conservation of wildlife in Film City. Beginning today, they will patrol Film City close to the film and television sets at Habale pada, behind Wagh Devi near Hathi gate, Kaliya Maidan, Link Road numbers 1 and 2, behind Vithu Mauli set, Appu Maidan, Bapu Nagar, Khandala ghat, pump house, and helipad area. A letter signed by the Chief Security Officer (CSO) of Film City, Ashok Jadhav, has been forwarded to all the teams of MSF and they have also been told to coordinate with the Forest Department. They will also have to update it about any untoward happenings regarding wildlife. This includes finding snares or suspicious activity during patrolling from 8:00am to 6:00pm.

Forest Dept speak
Deputy Conservator of Forest (DCF) Dr Jitendra Ramgaonkar said, "During yesterday's meeting with Film City officials, we pointed to them the seriousness of the issue, and how the garbage thrown near the film sets was attracting dogs, sambar and deer, which further attracts leopards. Majority of the snares that we found were close to the areas near the sets where garbage was illegally dumped. The CSO has sent out a circular with several instructions to the staff including formation of teams for patrolling and taking action against those dumping garbage illegally. From time-to-time our teams will also be patrolling the area, and strict action will be taken against those found involved in anything that can pose a threat to wild animals." This reporter saw that people party and consume alcohol deep inside the forest patches and on some deserted roads. Many liquor bottles and garbage were also seen dumped around.

Fine for violations
The CSO has also pointed out the issue of people trespassing into Film City and consuming liquor, and instructions have been given to take strict action against them. It has also been pointed in the letter that production houses or shooting units will have to segregate dry and wet waste and the caterer providing food to them will have to make sure that the wet garbage is disposed of properly outside. Those found illegally dumping garbage or film set material after the shooting in the Film City premises will have to pay a fine of Rs 25,000. For a delay in moving away the dismantled set outside Film City after three days, a fine of Rs 25,000 will be levied every day. It has also been mentioned in the letter that people should avoid feeding stray dogs on the roads as it attracts leopards.

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