Need separate queues for senior citizens, disabled, say Mumbaikars

Updated: Nov 14, 2016, 19:20 IST | Ranjeet Jadhav

While the decision to discontinue the old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes was welcomed by most, the inconvenience caused by it continues

Ummehaani Bagasrawala and her mother Rashida. Pic/Sneha Kharabe
Ummehaani Bagasrawala and her mother Rashida. Pic/Sneha Kharabe

While the decision to discontinue the old Rs 500 and Rs 1,000 currency notes was welcomed by most, the inconvenience caused by it continues. The most affected are the disabled and senior citizens. Banks, seemingly ill-prepared for the humungous move, have not made provisions for separate counters for the physically challenged and seniors.

Ummehaani Bagasrawala, who is visually challenged and works with students like herself, said, "For the last three days, I have stopped going to my computer class in Andheri because I don’t have enough cash to pay for the auto or taxi. My mother won’t allow me to stand in the long queues at ATMs or banks because in the chaos anything could happen. There should have been separate lines for people like us."

Ummehani also said that the new Rs 2,000 currency notes were confusing. "The current notes have different identification marks depending on the denominations, so we know if we are being cheated by someone. But, the new Rs 2,000 note feels fake as the paper quality seems poor.”

Ummehani’s mother, Rashida Bagasrawala, too, is finding it difficult to get out of the house. "I am a senior citizen and have to visit the doctor every day for my acupressure treatment. I haven’t been going for the past three days as I have no cash and am unable to stand for hours in a queue."

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