Never say die

Updated: Dec 22, 2019, 12:13 IST | Agencies |

Bereaved Californian couple seeks power of prayer to rescue their two-year-old from the afterlife

The Heiligenthal family. Pics/Instagram
The Heiligenthal family. Pics/Instagram

An American couple with the help of a church in California is on a mission to bring their late daughter back to life, after she passed away tragically. Two-year-old Olive died in her sleep last week, but her parents are convinced they can reverse the tragedy. They have appealed to their church community to help revive their daughter through the power of collective faith.

The Bethel Church in Redding has gone a step further by starting a GoFundMe campaign to raise $100,000 (R70 lakh) to help the bereaved parents cover "unforseeable expenses". On the same page, Olive's mum Kalley Heiligenthal has written, "We believe in a Jesus who died and conclusively defeated every grave, holding the keys to resurrection power. We need it for our little Olive Alayne, who stopped breathing yesterday and has been pronounced dead by doctors."

Olive Heiligenthal passed away in her sleep last week
Olive Heiligenthal passed away in her sleep last week

Over the past few days, large gatherings of people have flocked to the church to pray and sing fervently in the hope of Olive's resurrection. Many are confident that the Heiligenthals will get their miracle. The hashtag #wakeupolive is steadily gaining traction on Instagram.

Rs 70 lakh
Amount the church is trying to raise for grieving parents

Itna Santa kyun hai bhai

Brit accidentally buys wacky Christmas decoration four times his height

Ninghtclub owner Matty James was stunned when an inflatable Santa that he had ordered online turned out to be as tall as his home. The great Christmas mishap was the result of a small oversight on his part. "I thought it would be about eight feet tall but only realised it was much bigger when I laid it all out," he told The Daily Mail, UK.

Matty James's giant Santa Claus. Pic/Facebook
Matty James's giant Santa Claus. Pic/Facebook

The 25-feet decoration was the talk of the town before it was taken down for fear of it being swept away by the winds. The residents of Southport, Merseyside almost split their sides with laughter when they first caught sight of the supersize Santa. "I'm known in the street for doing wacky things and when the neighbours came out, they were all laughing their heads off, everyone was in hysterics," said James. The 32-year-old dad intends to reinstate the massive Kris Kringle once Christmas rolls around.

25ft
Height of the inflated Santa

Cheating on your partner just got safer

A website launched in November this year enables people in committed relationships to have a "safe", steamy affair with a co-worker. A user can log into the Affair At Work website, through Instagram and provide their coworker flame's contact details.

Cheating on your partner just got safer

The coworker then receives an email, notifying them about the sender's intention to have an affair with them. The receiver can indicate their interest by visiting the site and typing in the sender's email and Instagram handle. The site's founder Mike, a 36-year-old engineer, was inspired to start this venture after his friends found the idea interesting. He had himself been attracted to a colleague when he was in a serious relationship. Research has also found that workplace cheating is far
from a rarity.

Call it a wrap!

Call it a wrap!

A 56-second clip showing several inventive ways of wrapping Christmas presents has created quite a buzz online. The video was posted last week by @BlossomHacks on Twitter and has received more than 3.4 million viewers. The hacks presented, such as wrapping the present diagonally and taping the paper before wrapping the gift have gripped the audience's attention. Several viewers have expressed their surprise after watching the video and thanked the admin for sharing it.

A nest for the season

A nest for the season

A Georgia family got a shock of their life, when they discovered an owl nestled among the branches of their Christmas tree. Katie McBride Newman later shared a picture of the owl on Facebook. The family had to call a non-profit nature centre, to release the bird. Pic/Facebook

Briefs

Man with head stuck to legs finally stands up

Man with head stuck to legs finally stands up
Li Hua spent 30 years looking only at his thighs due to a spinal condition. Recently, he was successfully operated on at Shenzhen University General Hospital in China and is finally able to stand upright again.

Mum donates breast milk to 28 babies

Mum donates breast milk to 28 babies
A woman from Virginia has donated nearly 355 litres of breast milk to other infants over 18 months. Christina Resch's decision came after she realised that her son Finlay was drinking only a small fraction of the milk she was producing each day. She had even run out of space to store her milk.

Sisters charge $13 an hour to dress up tree

Sisters charge $13 an hour to dress up tree
Australian siblings Veronika Gentile and Giovanna Avati have made the most of people's lack of motivation to put up their own Christmas trees. The sisters are getting paid $13 (R930 approx.) an hour for their tree decoration services. Their business began as a friendly favour before the sisters started getting more requests.

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