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Alt News Pratik Sinha, Mohammed Zubair contenders for Nobel Peace Prize

Co-founders of fact checking website AltNews Pratik Sinha and Mohammed Zubair and Indian author Harsh Mander are among the favourites to win this year’s Nobel Peace Prize, according to shortlists released ahead of the announcement. The Nobel Peace Prize will be announced on October 7 in Oslo, Norway. Ahead of the announcement, predictions are being made about who and which organisations are the favourites and top-runners to win one of the most prestigious global honours. The Time magazine, in a report, compiled a list of “some of the favourites to win, based on nominations that were made public via Norwegian lawmakers, predictions from bookmakers, and picks from the Peace Research Institute Oslo.” The list includes journalists Sinha and Zubair, who "have relentlessly been battling misinformation in India.” The Time report said that the duo has “methodologically debunked rumors and fake news circulating on social media and called out hate speech. Zubair was arrested by the Delhi Police on June 27 for allegedly hurting religious sentiments through his tweets. The Time article notes that Zubair’s arrest was condemned by journalists around the world who “argued it was retribution for his fact-checking work.” The Time list of favourites also includes Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the UN Refugee Agency, Belarusian opposition politician Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya, the World Health Organisation, Russia’s jailed opposition leader and anti-corruption activist Alexey Navalny and Swedish climate activist Greta Thunburg. The Peace Research Institute Oslo (PRIO) director Henrik Urdal also released his annual shortlist of probable Peace laureates. His list includes Mander, and the campaign he launched in 2017 ‘Karwan-e-Mohabbat’. Urdal also names Sinha and Zubair as “other worthy candidates for a prize focused on combating religious extremism and intolerance” in India. “Religious extremism helps justify discrimination and violence, and stokes tensions between groups that can result in armed conflict. Making a significant contribution to fighting religious extremism and promoting interreligious dialogue is therefore a compelling rationale for being awarded a Nobel Peace Prize. A worthy recipient of such a prize is Harsh Mander, along with the campaign he launched in 2017, Karwan-e-Mohabbat ("Caravan of Love”),” according to Urdal’s shortlist. “Mander is an important voice for religious tolerance and dialogue, and his campaign an important rallying point for those who oppose interreligious conflict and violence.” This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

05 October,2022 09:31 PM IST | New York | PTI
US President Joe Biden. File Pic

US to impose costs on Iran for crackdown on protests: Joe Biden

The United States this week will impose further costs on Iranian officials responsible for violence against demonstrators who protested against Iran’s government after the death of Mahsa Amini, President Joe Biden said on Monday. Amini, a 22-year-old from Iranian Kurdistan, was arrested on Sept. 13 in Tehran for “unsuitable attire” by the morality police and died in custody. Within hours of her funeral in Saqez on Sept. 17, thousands of Iranians poured into the streets across the country. Security forces and the volunteer Basij militia, have cracked down on the protests. Rights groups put the death toll at over 130. Also Read: 19 more killed in Iranian protests Biden said he was “gravely concerned about reports of the intensifying violent crackdown on peaceful protesters in Iran”. “This week, the United States will be imposing further costs on perpetrators of violence against peaceful protesters. We will continue holding Iranian officials accountable and supporting the rights of Iranians to protest freely,” Biden said. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

05 October,2022 09:34 AM IST | Washington | Agencies
Arema FC players visit the tomb of a victim of the deadly stampede Monday. Pic/AFP

Indonesia stampede: Stadium exit gates too small for escape, say police

Indonesian police said on Tuesday that the gates at the soccer stadium where police fired tear gas and set off a deadly crush were too small and could only accommodate two at a time when hundreds were trying to escape. Photos from the Malang stadium showed four connecting doors forming one gate. Police said investigation was focused on six of the 14 gates where most of the spectators died in the crush. Also Read: Indonesian soccer fan recalls sting of tear gas before crush Police spokesperson Dedi Prasetyo said that they were unlocked but only able to accommodate two people. He added that the gates were the responsibility of the organisers. On Monday, police announced they had removed one police chief and nine elite officers and 18 others were being investigated for responsibility in the firing of tear gas in the stadium.  Indonesia’s soccer federation (PSSI) said the club’s security officer and the head of its organising committee would be banned from the sport for life, and fined the club 250 million rupiah ($16,398). Officials from FIFA and the Asian Football Confederation would visit the country, another PSSI official said. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

05 October,2022 09:29 AM IST | Malang | Agencies
Employees of an energy company inspect an electrical transformer substation destroyed by Russian missiles strike on the outskirts of Kharkiv Tuesday. Pic/AFP

Volodymyr Zelensky decree rules out Ukraine talks with Vladimir Putin

President Volodymyr Zelensky signed a decree on Tuesday formally declaring the prospect of any Ukrainian talks with Kremlin leader Vladimir Putin “impossible”, but leaving the door open to talks with Russia. The decree formalised comments made by Zelensky on Friday after the Russian president proclaimed four occupied regions of Ukraine to be part of Russia, in what Kyiv and the West said was an illegitimate farce.  “He (Putin) does not know what dignity and honesty are. Therefore, we are ready for a dialogue with Russia, but with another president of Russia,” Zelensky said on Friday. Ukrainian forces have broken through Russian defences in the south of the country and expanded a rapid offensive in the east, seizing back territory in areas annexed by Russia, which invaded Ukraine in February. The Kremlin said on Tuesday that its “special military operation” in Ukraine will not end if Kyiv rules out talks, adding that it “takes two sides to negotiate”. “We will either wait for the current president to change his position or wait for the next president to change his position in the interests of the Ukrainian people,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov told reporters. Also Read: Russian-installed official confirms Ukrainian breakthroughs in Kherson Lawyers overwhelmed Swamped by panic-stricken requests for help to avoid being drafted, Russian lawyers say they are working flat out to offer advice to those at risk of being sent to fight in Ukraine. Lawyers and civil society groups say they have been overwhelmed by demands for support since President Putin announced on Sept. 21 that 3,00,000 people would be mobilised to boost Russia’s flagging war effort. Thousands have fled to countries such as Kazakhstan, Georgia and Finland.  “We are working round the clock,” said Sergei Krivenko, who runs a group of around 10 lawyers called Citizen. Army. Law. “People are being torn from their normal lives,” he said. “This is a mobilisation without time limit during a war. It could last months or years. People may not return ... Leaving the army is pretty much impossible. The only way is death, injury or prison for disobeying orders.” Russian rapper kills himself A 27-year-old Russian rapper has died by suicide in order to avoid being conscripted into the war his country is fighting against Ukraine. New York Post translated the news published on a Russian news portal that said Ivan Vitalievich Petunin, was found dead on Friday after he jumped from a high-rise in Krasnodar. Ivan used to perform under the stage name ‘Walkie’. New York Post quoted a local media report that suggested the rapper recorded a heart-wrenching video message on Telegram before taking his life. “I can’t take the sin of murder on my soul and I don’t want to. I am not ready to kill for any ideals. To murder someone in war or otherwise is something I cannot do,” the rapper said in the video. He called Putin a “maniac” and said, “It seems to me that partial mobilization will become full in a few days.” “Forgive me, my loved ones, but sometimes you have to die for your principles,” he concluded. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

05 October,2022 09:26 AM IST | Kyiv | Agencies
Representational Pic

8-month-old baby among four-member Indian-origin family kidnapped in US

An Indian-origin family of four, including an 8-month-old child, has been kidnapped in the US state of California, police said and warned the suspect is armed and considered dangerous. The family from Central Valley was kidnapped in Merced County, California, on Monday. The family was identified as 8-month-old Aroohi Dheri, her 27-year-old mother Jasleen Kaur, her 36-year-old father Jasdeep Singh, and her 39-year-old uncle Amandeep Singh. The sheriff's office released two images of a person they believe to be the abductor, describing him as having a shaved head and wearing a hoodie. The 8-month-old girl and her parents were kidnapped by a person described as armed and dangerous, authorities said. A fourth relative was also taken from a family business in an unincorporated community in the Central Valley community, the Merced County Sheriff's Office said in a statement on Monday evening. Also Read: North Korea sends missile soaring over Japan in escalation In the statement Monday night, Merced County Sheriff Vern Warnke said that investigators were unsure of a motive but that authorities believe the kidnapper destroyed evidence to cover his tracks. "So far as I know no contact has been made nor ransom demands, nothing, from the suspects in this," he said. "We need your help." "We consider the suspect to be armed and dangerous," the sheriff's office said. "We have a lowlife out there that kidnapped an 8-month-old baby, her mom, her dad and her uncle. So far... we have no motivation behind it. We just know they are gone," said Sheriff Warnke. Deputies said the investigation is in its early stages. It asked the public to approach the sheriff's office if they see the suspect. "Do not approach him or the victims," it said. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

04 October,2022 04:39 PM IST | Los Angeles | PTI
A woman walks past a public television screen in Tokyo on October 4, 2022, displaying file footage of North Korean missile launches during a broadcast about an early morning. Pic/AFP

North Korea sends missile soaring over Japan in escalation

North Korea on Tuesday fired a ballistic missile over Japan for the first time in five years, forcing Japan to issue evacuation notices and suspend trains during the flight of the nuclear-capable weapon that could reach the US territory of Guam and beyond. The launch was the most provocative weapons demonstration by North Korea this year as it ramps up missile tests in its push to build a full-fledged nuclear arsenal that viably threatens US allies and the American homeland and earns the country recognition as a nuclear state. The United States said it strongly condemns North Korea's "dangerous and reckless decision" to launch what it described as a "long-range ballistic missile" over Japan. "This action is destabilising and shows (North Korea's) blatant disregard for United Nations Security Council resolutions and international safety norms," it said. South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol earlier said the missile had an intermediate range, while Japanese Defence Minister Yasukazu Hamada said it was believed to have an intermediate range or longer. If Tuesday's launch involves a long-range missile, that could be a test of a weapon targeting the US homeland, some experts say. Also Read: Pakistan drone spotted in Punjab's Gurdaspur sector Japanese authorities alerted residents in northeastern regions to evacuate to shelters, in the first "J-alert" since 2017 when North Korea fired an intermediate-range Hwasong-12 missile twice over Japan in a span of weeks during its previous torrid run of weapons tests. Trains were suspended in the Hokkaido and Aomori regions until the government issued a subsequent notice that the North Korean missile appeared to have landed in the Pacific. In Sapporo city, the prefectural capital of Japan's northernmost main island of Hokkaido, subways were also temporarily suspended, with stations packed with morning commuters. Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida told reporters the latest firing "is a reckless act and I strongly condemn it." South Korea's Joint Chiefs of Staff said the missile was fired from the inland north in North Korea. It warned the North's repeated missile launches would only deepen its international isolation and prompt Seoul and Washington to bolster their deterrence capacities. Yoon said the North's "reckless nuclear provocations" would meet the stern response of the South and the broader international community. According to South Korean and Japanese estimates, the missile traveled about 4,500-4,600 kilometers (2,800-2,860 miles) at a maximum altitude of 970-1,000 kilometers (600-620 miles). Hamada said the missile landed in the Pacific, about 3,200 kilometers (1,990 miles) off the northern Japanese coast and that there have been no reports of damage to Japanese aircraft and ships. Both South Korea and Japan convened emergency national security council meetings to discuss the launch. The U.S. said national security adviser Jake Sullivan had consulted with his South Korean and Japanese counterparts on their appropriate and robust responses. "The United States will continue its efforts to limit the DPRK's ability to advance its prohibited ballistic missile and weapons of mass destruction programs, including with allies and UN partners," National Security Council spokesperson Adrienne Watson said in a statement. The missile's flight distance shows the missile has enough range to hit the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam, home to U.S. military bases that sent advanced warplanes to the Korean Peninsula in shows of force in past tensions with North Korea. In 2017, North Korea threatened to make "an enveloping fire" near Guam with Hwasong-12 missiles amid rising animosities with the then-Trump administration. North Korea last test-fired a Hwasong-12 missile in January. At the time, the North said the launch was meant to verify the overall accuracy of the weapon, which it said was launched on a lofted angle to prevent it from flying over other countries. Hamada said the missile on Tuesday could have been another Hwasong-12. Kim Dong-yub, a professor at Seoul's University of North Korean Studies, said North Korea could have tested the Hwasong-12 again or even an intercontinental ballistic missile, closer to what would be a normal ballistic trajectory but shorter than its full range. If it was an ICBM, the purpose of the launch would be to test whether the warhead could survive the harsh conditions of atmospheric reentry, Kim said. Tuesday's launch is the fifth round of weapons tests by North Korea in the past 10 days in what was seen as an apparent response to military drills between South Korea and the United States and other training among the allies including Japan last week. The missiles fired during the past four rounds of launches were short-range and fell in the waters between the Korean Peninsula and Japan. Those missiles are capable of hitting targets in South Korea. North Korea has test-fired about 40 missiles over about 20 different launch events this year as its leader Kim Jong Un vows to expand his nuclear arsenal and refuses to return to nuclear diplomacy with the United States. Two of those tested were intercontinental ballistic missiles, but they didn't fly over other countries because one was launched at a high angle and the other didn't fly its full range. Some foreign experts say North Korea needs to master a few remaining technologies to acquire functioning nuclear missiles. Each new test pushes them closer to being able to reach the U.S. mainland and its allies with a host of nuclear-tipped missiles of varying range. Some experts say Kim eventually will return to diplomacy and use his enlarged arsenal to pressure Washington to accept his country as a nuclear state, a recognition that he thinks is necessary to win the lifting of international sanctions and other concessions. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

04 October,2022 11:16 AM IST | Seoul | AP
Civilians embrace a Ukrainian soldier in Kupiansk, Kharkiv region, Sunday. Pic/AFP

Russian-installed official confirms Ukrainian breakthroughs in Kherson

Ukrainian troops recaptured villages along the west bank of the Dnipro River in southern Ukraine on Monday in a major new breakthrough, opening a second big front that is forcing Moscow to abandon ground just days after claiming to annex it. The advance in Kherson province was Ukraine’s biggest in the south of the country since the war began, and follows similar breakthroughs in the east that have turned the tide of the war in recent weeks. The Russian-installed head of the administration in occupied parts of Ukraine’s Kherson province confirmed that Ukrainian troops had captured a number of settlements along the river, pushing as far as the vicinity of the village of Dudchany. This would represent a startling advance of around 40 km (25 miles) in a single day. “The information is tense, let’s put it that way, because, yes there were indeed breakthroughs,” Vladimir Saldo told Russian state television. “There’s a settlement called Dudchany, right along the Dnipro River, and right there, in that region, there was a (Ukrainian) breakthrough. There are settlements that are occupied by Ukrainian forces,” he said. Kyiv has so far maintained almost complete silence about the situation in Kherson. Also read: Japan urges residents to take shelter as North Korea fires missile Mobilised and sent home Thousands of Russians mobilised for military service in Ukraine have been sent home and the military commissar in Russia’s Khabarovsk region removed in the latest setback to President Vladimir Putin’s chaotic conscription of 3,00,000 servicemen.  Soldiers at oil, gas plants in Norway Norway’s military said on Monday it had posted soldiers to help guard major onshore oil and gas processing plants, part of a wider effort to boost security amid suspicion that sabotage caused leaks in the Nord Stream gas pipelines last week.  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

04 October,2022 10:08 AM IST | Kyiv | Agencies
A man walks past a public television screen in Tokyo on October 4, 2022, displaying file missile footage during a broadcast about an early morning North Korean missile launch which prompted an evacuation alert over northeastern Japan. Pic/AFP

Japan urges residents to take shelter as North Korea fires missile

Japan on Tuesday urged residents to evacuate to shelters after North Korea fired an unidentified ballistic missile that flew over Tokyo. According to Kyodo News, early Tuesday, the government issued an alert urging residents in Japan's northernmost main island of Hokkaido and the country's northeastern prefecture of Aomori to stay inside buildings. During a press conference, Chief Cabinet Secretary Hirokazu Matsuno as quoted by Kyodo News said that after crossing northeast Japan the missile is believed to have fallen in the Pacific Ocean outside Japan's exclusive economic zone around 7:44 am (local time). Also Read: Devendra Fadnavis slams Nana Patole over his 'Cheetah' remark targeting Centre Meanwhile, the South Korean military said that North Korea fired a mid-range ballistic missile eastward from Mupyong-ri in the northern province of Jagang. Citing Japanese government source, Kyodo News reported that there were no immediate reports of damage to aircraft or ships. Earlier, North Korea fired missiles on Saturday in an apparent protest against joint naval drills held last week involving the United States and South Korea, as per the media outlet.  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

04 October,2022 08:44 AM IST | Tokyo | ANI
Secretary of the Nobel Committee for Physiology or Medicine, Thomas Perlmann announces the winner of the 2022 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, Svante Paabo. Pic/ AFP

Swedish geneticist Svante Paabo receives Nobel Prize in Medicine

Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology 2022 was awarded to Svante Paabo for his discoveries concerning the genomes of extinct hominins and human evolution, announced the award-giving organisation on Monday. "The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet has today decided to award the 2022 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine to Svante Paabo for his discoveries concerning the genomes of extinct hominins and human evolution," read the Nobel Prize statement. The 2022 Nobel Prize laureate Svante Paabo found that gene transfer had occurred from the now extinct hominins to Homo sapiens. This ancient flow of genes to present-day humans has physiological relevance today, for example affecting how our immune system reacts to infections, the statement said. Svante Paabo has established an entirely new scientific discipline, paleogenomics. By revealing genetic differences that distinguish all living humans from extinct hominins, his discoveries provide the basis for exploring what makes us uniquely human. Through his pioneering research, Svante Paabo accomplished something seemingly impossible: sequencing the genome of the Neanderthal, an extinct relative of present-day humans. He also made the sensational discovery of a previously unknown hominin, Denisova, entirely from genome data retrieved from a small finger bone specimen. Also Read: Made-in-India light combat helicopters 'Prachand' inducted into IAF Importantly, Paabo also found that gene transfer had occurred from these now extinct hominins to Homo sapiens following the migration from Africa around 70,000 years ago, the statement read. Svante Paabo is a Swedish geneticist specialising in the field of evolutionary genetics who was recruited to the University of Munich in 1990, where, as a newly appointed Professor, he continued his work on archaic DNA. Earlier in 2020, David Julius and Ardem Patapoutian jointly won the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of receptors for temperature and touch. David Julius utilized capsaicin, a pungent compound from chilli peppers that induces a burning sensation, to identify a sensor in the nerve endings of the skin that responds to heat. Ardem Patapoutian used pressure-sensitive cells to discover a novel class of sensors that respond to mechanical stimuli in the skin and internal organs. These breakthrough discoveries launched intense research activities leading to a rapid increase in the understanding of how the nervous system senses heat, cold, and mechanical stimuli. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

03 October,2022 03:35 PM IST | Stockholm | ANI
Victor, or the Old Mazay, with his music box in Kharkiv  Saturday. Victor plays the box, his son’s present from Poland, once or twice a week since 2017, as he wishes to save people’s souls with the music. Pic/AFP

Ukraine celebrates capturing key town, as Putin ally mulls nuclear response

Ukrainian troops said they had taken the key bastion of Lyman in occupied eastern Ukraine, a stinging defeat that prompted a close ally of Russian President Vladimir Putin to call for the possible use of low-grade nuclear weapons.  The capture on Saturday came just a day after Putin proclaimed the annexation of nearly a fifth of Ukraine – including Donetsk, where Lyman is located – and placed the regions under Russia’s nuclear umbrella. Ukrainian soldiers announced the capture in a video recorded outside the town council building in the centre of Lyman and posted on social media by Kyrylo Tymoshenko, deputy head of President Volodymyr Zelensky’s office. “Dear Ukrainians - today the armed forces of Ukraine ... liberated and took control of the settlement of Lyman, Donetsk region,” one of the soldiers says.  Also Read: Ukraine’s nuclear plant head said to be ‘kidnapped’ by Russia At the end of the video, a group of soldiers throw Russian flags down from the building’s roof and raise a Ukrainian flag in their place. Seeking to capitalise on Ukraine’s recent gains, Zelensky promised more quick successes in the Donbas, which covers the Donetsk and Luhansk regions that are largely under Russian control. “Over the past week, the number of Ukrainian flags in Donbas has increased. There will be even more a week’s time,” the president said in a video address. Ukraine’s successes have infuriated Putin allies such as Ramzan Kadyrov, the leader of Russia’s southern Chechnya region. “In my personal opinion, more drastic measures should be taken, right up to the declaration of martial law in the border areas and the use of low-yield nuclear weapons,” Kadyrov wrote on Telegram.  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

03 October,2022 09:04 AM IST | Kyiv | Agencies
A broken section of Pine Island Road and destroyed houses in  Florida Saturday. Pic/AFP

Daunting recovery for Florida and the Carolinas

The largely innocuous but soggy remnants of Hurricane Ian drifted through Virginia early on Sunday, leaving in their wake storm-ravaged residents in Florida and the Carolinas facing a disaster recovery expected to cost tens of billions of dollars. The storm’s toll on human life also was expected to rise as floodwaters receded and search teams pushed farther into areas initially cut off from the outside world, seeking stranded survivors and remains of anyone who may have perished. At least 50 storm-related deaths have been confirmed since Ian crashed ashore Florida’s Gulf Coast. Florida accounted for the bulk of fatalities, with 35 tallied by the sheriff’s office in coastal Lee County, and 11 other deaths reported by state officials in four neighboring counties. North Carolina authorities said at least four more people had been killed there. No deaths were immediately reported in South Carolina.     This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

03 October,2022 09:02 AM IST | Miami | Agencies
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