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23-year-old Indian student dies after being struck by police vehicle in US

A 23-year-old student from Andhra Pradesh died after being struck by a police patrol vehicle in Seattle, a media report said. Jaahnavi Kandula, a student of Northeastern University campus in South Lake Union, was walking near Dexter Avenue North and Thomas Street when she was hit by a Seattle Police vehicle on Monday, The Seattle Times reported. Police arrived at the scene just after 8 p.m. and immediately started with CPR after they found Kandula with life threatening injuries. She was later transported to Harborview Medical Center in critical condition where she succumbed to her injuries. The officer driving the patrol SUV was responding to a priority one call at the request of the Seattle Fire Department just after 8 p.m., according to the Seattle Police Department. The police did not name the officer but said in a statement that he has been with the department since November 2019. "At this point in the investigation, we have no reason to believe the officer intended to hit that woman," Seattle Police Department spokesperson Detective Valerie Carson told Seattle Times. Also Read: Israeli forces kill two Palestinians amid new violence Carson further said that Kandula's death will not be investigated as a use of force case, and the officer has not been placed on leave. "I was in shock," Ashok Mandula, victim's uncle, told Seattle Times after he was informed of the tragedy. He said Kandula first travelled to the United States in 2021 from Adoni in Andhra Pradesh's Kurnool district, and spent a month with his family. Daughter of a single mother who teaches in an elementary school in Adoni, Kandula was to receive a master's in information systems this December, Mandula told Times. He added that Kandula's mother had taken a loan for her education. Detectives from the Traffic Collision Investigation Squad will lead the investigation, Seattle Police said. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

26 January,2023 08:23 PM IST | New York | IANS
Map of Yemen; used for representational purpose. Pic/istock

USD 4.3 billion required for Yemen humanitarian needs in 2023, says UN

The United Nations said on Wednesday it needs USD 4.3 billion to fund its humanitarian activities in war-torn Yemen this year. The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said the funds are required to help 17.3 million most vulnerable people in Yemen. The agency said it plans to deliver "urgent life-saving" assistance to 14 million people in 2023. In total, 21.6 million -- two thirds of the country's population -- would need humanitarian assistance and protection services this year, down from 23.4 million people in 2022, OCHA estimated. Last year, the UN humanitarian plan cost USD 4.27 billion to assist 17.9 million people. Also read: Yemen, Lebanon heritage sites added to UNESCO endangered list Yemen has been convulsed by civil war since 2014 when Iran-backed Houthi rebels seized the capital of Sanaa, forcing the internationally recognised government to flee to the south, then to Saudi Arabia. A Saudi-led coalition entered the war in March 2015 to try to restore the government to power. The war has deteriorated largely into a stalemate and spawned one of the world's worst humanitarian crises. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 08:10 PM IST | Cairo | AP
A Palestinian woman confronts Israeli police during clashes on Nakba Day at Damascus Gate, East Jerusalem. (Used for representational purpose) Pic/istock

Israeli forces kill two Palestinians amid new violence

Israeli troops shot and killed a Palestinian who allegedly tried to stab a soldier in the occupied West Bank on Wednesday, while a Palestinian teenager was shot dead after brandishing what Israeli police said was a fake pistol during an operation in east Jerusalem, according to Palestinian officials. They were the latest deaths in a surge of violence that shows no signs of slowing. The violence comes at a time of tensions over Israel's new government, the most right wing in Israel's history. On Wednesday, ultranationalist Cabinet minister Itamar Ben-Gvir promised to continue visits to a flashpoint Jerusalem holy site, despite pleas from neighbouring Jordan that Israel maintain a delicate status quo at the site. The Palestinian Health Ministry identified the man killed as Aref Abdel Nasser Lahlouh, 20. The Israeli military said the man was carrying a knife and was shot after he attempted to attack a soldier at a military post. Video on social media showed a man getting out of a car, running toward soldiers while holding an object in his right hand, and then falling to the ground. Earlier on Wednesday, Israeli forces demolished the home of a Palestinian gunman who allegedly killed a female Israeli soldier at an east Jerusalem checkpoint last year. Israel says such demolitions deter future attacks, while Palestinians and rights groups say they unfairly punish people who were not involved in violence. Police said some 300 officers and troops entered the Shuafat refugee camp to demolish the home of Uday Tamimi. Police said they opened fire on a Palestinian who they suspected was armed and aiming at forces, but the weapon turned out to be fake. Also read: Palestine seeks international sanctions against Israel The Palestinian Health Ministry said 17-year-old Mohammed Ali was killed. Footage released by police showed the teen, his face covered and wearing a hood, among a crowd of masked youths and aiming what appears to be a pistol. The video shows him running off, dropping the weapon and then falling to the ground.Wednesday's deaths brought the number of Palestinians killed by Israeli fire to 20, this year. Nearly 150 Palestinians were killed last year, making it the deadliest since 2004, according to figures by the Israeli rights group B'Tselem. Tensions have been high for months as Israel has been conducting nightly arrest raids in the West Bank, which were prompted by a spate of Palestinian attacks against Israelis last spring. Some 30 people were killed in Israel by Palestinians in 2022. Israel says most of the Palestinians killed have been militants. But others including stone-throwing youths protesting the incursions or people not involved in the violence have also been killed. After the shooting attack last year that killed the 19-year-old soldier, the attacker fled, sparking a weeklong manhunt and tight restrictions around Shuafat. As part of the search, Israeli security forces choked off the camp's entry and exit points, bringing life to a standstill for its estimated 60,000 residents. Tamimi was eventually killed after opening fire at security guards at the entrance to a West Bank settlement near Jerusalem. Ben-Gvir, an ultranationalist who oversees the police as Israel's new national security minister, welcomed Wednesday's demolition. "This step is very important, but not enough at all. We must destroy all terrorists' homes and deport the terrorists themselves from the country," he said. He also said on Wednesday he would continue visits to a sensitive sacred compound a day after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Jordanian King Abdullah II met and discussed the political sensitivities at the site, which Muslims call the Noble Sanctuary and Jews call the Temple Mount. "I manage my own policy concerning the Temple Mount, not that of the Jordanian government," Ben-Gvir told Israeli public broadcaster Kan. "I went up to the Temple Mount, I will continue to go up to the Temple Mount." Days after taking office, Ben-Gvir made a visit to the site, drawing condemnations from Jordan and across the Arab world. The visit was seen as a provocation, due to Ben-Gvir's past calls to change longstanding arrangements at the site. Under an arrangement that has prevailed for decades under Jordan's custodianship, Jews are permitted visits during certain hours but may not pray there. But Jewish religious nationalists, including Ben-Gvir, have increasingly visited the site and demanded equal prayer rights for Jews there. The Palestinians fear this is a step toward taking over the site. The site, the emotional heart of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, has frequently been the scene of clashes between Palestinians and Israeli police. It is home to the Al-Aqsa Mosque, the third-holiest site in Islam. Jews call it the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism. Israel captured the West Bank and east Jerusalem, along with the Gaza Strip, in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians seek those territories for their hoped-for independent state. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 08:06 PM IST | Jerusalem | AP
Map of Nigeria; used for representational purpose. Pic/istock

Drone strike kills 21 civilians in north Nigeria, claim witnesses

A weapon fired from the air in Nigeria killed at least 21 members of a civilian defence group as they responded to an attack by gunmen in the country's volatile north, witnesses said on Wednesday. Authorities have not said who was responsible for the strike, which residents described as coming from a drone. It took place in Niger state, one of Nigeria's most insecure areas despite its close proximity to the capital, Abuja. Ayuba Lagodo, a member of the civilian defence group that tries to protect villagers, said a drone strike hit shortly after residents reported an attack under way in Galadimakogo. Such defence groups are common in Nigeria's north, where many hot spots of violence have an inadequate official security presence. At least 21 people were confirmed dead after Tuesday's strike. Lagodo said the death toll would likely rise because many people were critically wounded or unaccounted for. While it wasn't clear who launched the drone, blame quickly fell on the Nigeria Air Force, which has carried out similar strikes in recent years. Federal police in Niger state told The Associated Press on Wednesday that a military operation had been conducted in the state. However, spokespeople for the Nigerian Air Force and Nigeria's Defence Headquarters have yet to respond to media inquiries. Two state government officials have started to investigate the incident, said Mary Noel-Berge, chief press secretary to Niger's governor. Also read: Dozens kidnapped as gunmen attack train station in Nigeria Military air raids are common in Nigeria, where an Islamist insurgency in the northeast and violent attacks by armed groups in the northwest and central regions have overstretched the country's armed forces. In 2017, more than 100 people were killed when a refugee camp was mistakenly bombed. Some Nigerian army soldiers died in 2021 after a fighter jet that security forces said was targeting extremists bombed their truck. "Accidental strikes are very rampant in Nigeria. One of the things we can attribute this to is faulty intel," Confidence MacHarry, a security analyst with the Lagos-based SBM Intelligence security firm, said. "A lack of accountability also plays a role," he added. "Not a single person has been punished in the history of all these airstrikes on civilians," MacHarry said. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 04:13 PM IST | Abuja, Nigeria | AP
Image used for representational purpose. Pic/iStock

Yemen, Lebanon heritage sites added to UNESCO endangered list

An ancient Yemeni kingdom and a Lebanese modernist concrete fair park were added on Wednesday to UNESCO's list of World Heritage sites in danger, the latest entries from The Middle East. The seven major landmarks of the Ancient Yemenite Kingdom of Saba and the Rachid Karami International Fair in Tripoli were inscribed on the UN agency list in 'an emergency procedure,'' in hopes of better preserving the neglected sites. Now added, both sites will have access to enhanced technical and financial assistance, UNESCO said. The pre-Islamic Yemeni kingdom of Saba, which once stretched from Sanaa to Marib, now lies on one of the major front lines dividing Houthi rebels from Saudi coalition forces. The threat of destruction from the ongoing conflict was cited as the key reason to add the seven landmarks that include several ancient temples, a dam and the ruins of old Marib. Yemen's ruinous conflict began in 2014 when Iranian-backed rebels swept down from the mountain and occupied the capital, Sanaa, along with much of Northern Yemen, ousting the internationally recognised government. A Saudi-led coalition -- armed with US and UK weaponry and intelligence -- entered the war on the side of Yemen's exiled government in March 2015. A barrage of Saudi-led airstrikes has destroyed historic mud homes in Northern Saada, the historic Houthi heartlands, and damaged much of the over 2,500-year-old Old City in the centre of Sanaa, also a UNESCO World Heritage site. Also read: ASI probes 'risks' to UNESCO World Heritage Khajuraho temples In 2015, airstrikes partially destroyed a section of the Great Marib Dam, near the Awwam Temple, one of the seven landmarks. Lebanon's modernist Rachid Karami International Fair was designed during the 1960s as part of a wider policy to modernise the country. Funding shortages continually interrupted construction before the half-built site was eventually abandoned following the outbreak of civil war in the mid-1970s. In recent years, the 70-hectare (173-acre) site, headed by a boomerang-shaped concert hall, has caught the attention of several developers. UNESCO said it added the site following concerns over its 'state of conservation'' and fears that a new renovation could undermine the ''integrity of the complex". Since 2019, Lebanon has been embroiled in an economic crisis, with the currency having lost over 90 per cent of its value since then. The financial crisis has plunged three-quarters of the population into poverty, with millions struggling to cope with some of the world's sharpest inflation. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 03:38 PM IST | Cairo | AP
File Photo/AFP

Sirens across Ukraine as authorities report Russian attacks

Ukrainian officials said Thursday that Russia has launched a wave of missile and self-exploding drone attacks on the country. Air raid sirens wailed nationwide, but there were no immediate reports of injuries or of the missiles and drones striking targets. The attacks came after Germany and the United States announced Wednesday that they will send advanced battle tanks to Ukraine, offering what one expert called an armored punching force to help Kyiv break combat stalemates as the Russian invasion enters its 12th month.  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 01:35 PM IST | Kyiv | AP
Prime Minister Narendra Modi. File Pic

We support importance of free press: US on BBC documentary on PM Modi

Describing India banning the BBC documentary on Prime Minister Narendra Modi as a matter of press freedom, the US State Department said that it is high time to highlight the importance of democratic principles like freedom of expression and make it a point around the world as well as in India. Ned Price, the US State Department spokesperson, in a regular briefing on Wednesday underlined that Washington supports free press around the world and that it is a matter of utmost importance to highlight democratic principles like freedom of expression. Responding to a media query, Price said, "We support the importance of a free press around the world. We continue to highlight the importance of democratic principles, such as freedom of expression, freedom of religion or belief, as human rights that contribute to the strengthening of our democracies. This is a point we make in our relationships around the world. It's certainly a point we've made in India as well." Earlier, addressing a press briefing on Monday (local time), Price stated that there are numerous elements that bolster the US' global strategic partnership with India which include political, economic and exceptionally deep people-to-people ties. Also Read: BBC documentary screening: Four students detained at Jamia University, cops deployed "I'm not familiar with the documentary you're referring to. I am very familiar with the shared values that enact the United States and India as two thriving, vibrant democracies. When we have concerns about actions that are taken in India, we've voiced those we've had an occasion to do that," he said. Last week, UK Prime Minister Rishi Sunak defended Prime Minister Narendra Modi and distanced himself from the BBC documentary series, saying he "doesn't agree with the characterisation" of his Indian counterpart. Sunak made these remarks on the controversial documentary that was raised in the British Parliament by Pakistan-origin MP Imran Hussain. UK's national broadcaster BBC had aired a two-part series attacking PM Narendra Modi's tenure as Gujarat Chief Minister during the Gujarat riots of 2002. The documentary sparked outrage and was removed from select platforms. The Ministry of External Affairs responded to the BBC story by claiming that it was entirely biased. While addressing a weekly presser in New Delhi, MEA spokesperson Arindam Bagchi said, "We think this is a propaganda piece. This has no objectivity. This is biased. Do note that this hasn't been screened in India. We don't want to answer more on this so that this doesn't get much dignity." He even raised questions on "the purpose of the exercise and the agenda behind it."  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

26 January,2023 12:29 PM IST | Washington | ANI
A lifeboat floats in sea

Two die, nine missing after cargo ship sinks off Japan

Thirteen crew members were rescued from a cargo ship that sank off southwestern Japan early on Wednesday during fierce winter winds but two have since died, the coast guard said. Rescuers were searching for the remaining nine. Search op underway, on Wed. Pic/AFP/Japan Coast Guard The 6,651-tonne Hong Kong-registered “Jintian” issued a distress call late on Tuesday, the Japan Coast Guard said. Media reported a person on the ship said it was listing and taking on water, and later reports said the 22 crew--all Chinese or Myanmar nationals--had transferred to lifeboats. There was no immediate word on what caused the vessel, which was carrying lumber, to capsize. A Coast Guard spokesperson said winds were strong at the time.  The Coast Guard immediately sought assistance from patrol ships and aircraft in the vicinity west of Nagasaki, government spokesman Hirokazu Matsuno said. The ship sank at 2.46 am, he added, quoting other vessels in the area. The Coast Guard “is also seeking cooperation from the Self-Defence Forces, South Korean Coast Guard, and vessels sailing near the waters”, Matsuno told reporters. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

26 January,2023 11:45 AM IST | Tokyo | Agencies
Ukrainian activists rally outside the German embassy in Tbilisi, Georgia, on Wednesday. Pic/AFP

Germany to send heavy Leopard tanks to Ukraine

Germany will supply its Leopard 2 tanks to Ukraine, it announced on Wednesday, overcoming misgivings about sending heavy weaponry that Kyiv sees as crucial to defeat the Russian invasion but Moscow cast as a needless provocation. Pressure has been building for weeks on German Chancellor Olaf Scholz’s government to send the tanks and allow other NATO allies to do the same ahead of expected spring offensives by both sides that could help turn the tide of the war. Scholz’s government had stalled on the decision, wary of moves that could prompt Russia to escalate or suck the NATO alliance into becoming party to the conflict.  Germany’s decision paves the way for other countries such asPoland, Spain and Norway to supply their stocks of Leopard tanks to Ukraine. “This decision follows our well-known line of supporting Ukraine to the best of our ability,” Scholz said in a statement. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

26 January,2023 11:43 AM IST | Tokyo | Agencies
Former US secretary of state Mike Pompeo wrote in a book, published on Tuesday, that India and Pakistan came close to nuclear war in 2019 and that US intervention prevented escalation. Pic/AFP

India-Pak were on brink of nuclear war: Mike Pompeo

Mike Pompeo, former US secretary of state, wrote in a book published on Wednesday that India and Pakistan had come close to nuclear war in 2019 and that US intervention prevented escalation. “I do not think the world properly knows just how close the India-Pakistan rivalry came to spilling over into a nuclear conflagration in February 2019,” the likely future presidential contender wrote in “Never Give an Inch,” his memoir of his time as Donald Trump’s top diplomat and earlier CIA chief. India in February 2019 broke precedent by launching airstrikes inside Pakistani territory after blaming a terrorist group there for a suicide bombing that killed 41 CRPF jawans in Kashmir. India shot down an F-16 during an aerial combat in which an Indian warplane was shot down by Pakistan and the pilot was captured by them. Also Read: US embassy launches new initiative to cut visa wait time Pompeo, who was in Hanoi for a summit between Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, said he was woken up with an urgent call from a senior Indian official. “He believed the Pakistanis had begun to prepare their nuclear weapons for a strike. India, he informed me, was contemplating its own escalation,” Pompeo wrote. “I asked him to do nothing and give us a minute to sort things out,” Pompeo said. Pompeo said that US diplomats convinced both India and Pakistan that neither was preparing to go nuclear. “No other nation could have done what we did that night to avoid a horrible outcome,” Pompeo wrote. Pompeo, who wrote that Pakistan “probably enabled” the Kashmir attack, said he spoke to “the actual leader of Pakistan,” then army chief General Qamar Javed Bajwa, in an allusion to the weakness of civilian governments. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

26 January,2023 11:42 AM IST | Washington | Agencies
This handout picture released by Deputy head of Ukraine's Presidential Office Kyrylo Tymoshenko on his Telegram channel on January 24, 2023 shows himself holding a handwritten letter the day he presented his resignation Pic/AFP

Senior Ukraine officials quit in corruption crackdown

The deputy head of Ukraine’s presidential office quit Tuesday, after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky pledged to launch a staff shake-up amid high-level corruption allegations during the war with Russia. Kyrylo Tymoshenko asked to be relieved of his duties, according to an online copy of a decree signed by Zelensky and Tymoshenko’s own social media posts. Neither gave a reason for the resignation. Deputy Defense Minister Viacheslav Shapovalov also resigned, local media reported, alleging his departure was linked to a scandal involving the purchase of food for the Ukrainian Armed Forces. Deputy Prosecutor General Oleksiy Symonenko also quit. Tymoshenko joined the presidential office in 2019, after working on Zelensky’s media and creative content strategy during his presidential campaign. Zelensky had promised personnel changes in the government, regional administrations and security forces following corruption allegations that emerged after Russia’s invasion last February. Also Read: Russia shoots down Ukrainian drone near its Engels airbase, reports Russian Military Permission sought from Germany Poland has officially requested permission from Germany to transfer its Leopard 2 tanks to Ukraine, Polish Defense Minister Mariusz Błaszczak said Tuesday. Berlin has received Warsaw’s request, Błaszczak said in a tweet, though German officials did not immediately confirm that. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

25 January,2023 10:02 AM IST | Kyiv | Agencies
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