The Curse Of The Weeping Woman Movie Review: Fairly efficient genre tricks, minus the sting!

Updated: Apr 19, 2019, 11:25 IST | Johnson Thomas

The Curse Of The Weeping Woman leaps to 1973 Los Angeles, a convenient period that hopes to link-up a priest from the Annabelle world and transports him into the weeping woman miniverse

The Curse Of The Weeping Woman Movie Review: Fairly efficient genre tricks, minus the sting!
The Curse Of The Weeping Woman

The Curse Of The Weeping Woman
U/A: Horror, mystery
Director: Michael Chaves
Cast: Linda Cardellini, Patricia Velasquez, Sean Thomas
Ratings: Rating

This film, derived from a Latin American folk tale, has been force-fitted into the Conjuring-Annabelle universe. Writers Mikki Daughty and Tobias Iaconis, and director Michael Chaves turn a demented criminal act into grist for an insidious tale involving a social worker working with abandoned wives. The film bears the brunt of this conspired opportunism.

The narrative opens with the origin of the folklore in 17th century Mexico, where it is showcases a beautiful woman (abandoned by her husband) in a fit of jealous rage, drowns their two male offsprings, kills herself and then roams around as a restless weeping ghost, seeking to replace her dead children by sacrificing other kids. The Curse Of The Weeping Woman leaps to 1973 Los Angeles, a convenient period that hopes to link-up a priest from the Annabelle world and transports him into the weeping woman miniverse.

A recent cop-widow Anna (Linda Cardellini), who works for Child Protective Services, has just been entrusted with the task of rescuing two young boys - Sam and Chris from their abusive mother, Patricia Alvarez (Patricia Velasquez). Anna puts the boys in a home for the evening, hoping they would feel secure and comforted in the care of professionals. But a late night call from the cops tells a different story. The boys are dead and Alvarez holds Anna accountable.

Watch the trailer of The Curse Of The Weeping Woman:

The malevolent ghost - a typically yellow-eyed blotchy-skinned bride weeping icky black tears starts haunting the boys. The jump-scares don't have the power to scare the audience, but it definitely makes the children sweat. The opening and shutting of doors and windows accompanied by sound effects don't scale up the scares either.

The set-up is intriguing enough but the visions are feeble and the horror quotient is laughable. Anna claims she is a non-believer, but when her children are affected and strange things begin to happen, she seeks help from a curandero - a former priest turned shaman, Rafael Olvera (Raymond Cruz), who uses his skills to keep fear at bay. Cardellini and Cruz do their best to make this trope happy formulaic poser an efficient one, but alas!

Also Read: Kalank Movie Review: A great cinematic experience, but is it worth a watch?

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