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Home > Mumbai > Mumbai News > Article > Mumbai Why dengue hit different this monsoon

Mumbai: Why dengue hit different this monsoon

Updated on: 31 October,2023 06:01 AM IST  |  Mumbai
Eshan Kalyanikar | eshan.kalyanikar@mid-day.com

Experts pin blame for unusually high infections this year to rampant construction activity; warn that cases could continue to go up till the end of winter

Mumbai: Why dengue hit different this monsoon

The previous month also witnessed a substantial number of cases marking some of the highest figures in recent years. Representation pic

As the city’s monsoon season concludes, the incidence of many monsoon-related ailments has decreased. However, dengue and malaria cases continue to be reported in significant numbers, with even Deputy Chief Minister Ajit Pawar contracting dengue recently.
 
In October, the city reported 737 dengue cases and 680 malaria cases, a notably high figure. The previous month also witnessed a substantial number of cases, with 1313 dengue cases and 1360 malaria cases, marking some of the highest figures in recent years. The health department of the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC) stated, “The cases have shown a declining trend in the month of October compared to September.” Meanwhile, BMC has not released mortality data for monsoon-related ailments yet.


Large numbers of dengue cases are common in urban areas where development works take place, say doctors. Representation pic
Large numbers of dengue cases are common in urban areas where development works take place, say doctors. Representation pic


Dr Pratapsinh Sarnikar, Maharashtra’s joint director of health, said, “This is common in the months following the monsoon, and the cases are expected to rise until winter.” He also mentioned that intermittent rains this year contributed to an increase in dengue cases across the state, not limited to Mumbai. From January to the end of September, the state recorded 10,553 dengue cases, with Mumbai reporting the highest number. In contrast, the dean of a prominent BMC-run hospital in central Mumbai noted a decrease in fever patients at their hospital. “Patients with complications are also rare, and the recovery rate is high,” he said.


Conversely, Dr Urvi Maheshwari, an internal medicine specialist at Zynova Shalby Hospital, reported that out of 10 patients rushing to the hospital with fever symptoms, 8 tested positive for dengue. She also mentioned cases where patients display dengue symptoms, but their tests yield negative results. Dr Maheshwari added that while dengue cases are expected to increase after the monsoon due to water stagnation conditions, this year, unchecked construction activities are responsible for the rise in dengue. “We are also seeing dengue patients develop complications like respiratory issues, and some are on life support; such cases have slightly increased this month,” she said. At HN Reliance Hospital, Dr Rahul Pandit, in charge of critical care, has observed fewer dengue patients with complications compared to the previous month. “The problem is more with stagnant water, which can be found not just at construction sites but also indoors,” he said.

Dr Pradip Awate, former state surveillance officer for epidemic diseases, previously had informed mid-day that large numbers of dengue cases are common in urban areas where frequent development works take place. He had emphasised that construction sites are potential mosquito breeding spots, as many frequently flout vector-control regulations. In September, BMC collected a little over Rs 19 lakh in fines since January after taking legal action against 1,242 entities that failed to adhere to pest control norms.

737
No of dengue cases reported in Mumbai in October

680
No of malaria cases in Mumbai in October

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