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China warns Australia to act prudently in naval operations in the South China Sea

Updated on: 28 November,2023 05:10 PM IST  |  Mumbai
mid-day online correspondent |

China Tuesday warned Australia to act with "great prudence" in deploying warships in the South China Sea after a recent confrontation between the two navies

China warns Australia to act prudently in naval operations in the South China Sea

China warns Australia to act prudently in naval operations in the South China Sea

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China Tuesday warned Australia to act with "great prudence" in deploying warships in the South China Sea after a recent confrontation between the two navies.


A visiting Chinese official Liu Jianchao, the Communist Party's international minister, gave the warning while speaking at a Sydney university during a trip that paves the way for President Xi Jinping's Australian visit, expected to take place next year, news wire Associated Press reported.


Bilateral relations had been improving recently, but took a downturn when Australia accused the Chinese destroyer CNS Ningbo of injuring Australian navy divers with sonar pulses in Japanese waters on November 14. Australia said China disregarded a safety warning to keep away from the Australian frigate HMAS Toowoomba.


Liu reiterated China's position that the encounter happened outside Japanese territorial waters and that the Chinese warship caused no harm.

“We do urge the Australian government and also the military to act with great prudence in this area,” Liu said at the University of Technology, Sydney.

“Such a small incident could really escalate if it's not properly managed,” he added.

Also read: China scaling its crackdown on mosques beyond Xinjiang: Human Rights Watch

The Toowoomba went on to further antagonize Beijing by passing southward from Japan through the contested Taiwan Strait last week.

Liu said Australia was making a statement through the maneuver that it was containing China.

The U.S., Canadian and Australian militaries have complained multiple times about what they say have been dangerous actions by the Chinese navy and air force in the western Pacific. Analysts fear a collision or other accident could spark an international incident and escalate into conflict.

Liu's visits comes after Anthony Albanese recently became Australia's first prime minister to visit China in seven years.

Meanwhile, the Albanese government will welcome the high-level Chinese delegation despite tensions over the recent incident between warships from each country that left Australian divers injured.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese Monday evaded questions about whether he protested directly to Chinese President Xi Jinping about the incident a fortnight ago in the East China Sea.

Also, it emerged that Chinese fighter jets shadowed Australian-Filipino joint patrols of the South China Sea over the weekend, after HMAS Toowoomba completed a transit of the Taiwan Strait on Thursday, prompting a fresh warning from Beijing against foreign militaries making “provocations”.

The signs of fresh strains in the relationship come as the head of the Chinese Communist Party’s International Department, Liu Jianchao, arrived in Australia late on Monday for a three-day visit. (With inputs from Agencies)

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