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Can consuming vegetarian food raise the risk of hip fracture in women?

For decades now, the benefits of vegetarian diets and non-vegetarian diets have been discussed. While avoiding the latter has been known to reduce the risk of diseases. However, a new study has found that women who ate a vegetarian diet were actually at a 33 per cent higher risk of hip fracture compared to regular meat eaters. The study was conducted with over 26,000 middle-aged women in the UK. Vegetarian diets have gained popularity in recent years. These is often perceived as a healthier dietary option, with previous evidence that shows a vegetarian diet can reduce the risks of several chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, and cancer compared to omnivorous diets. There is also a worldwide call for reducing the consumption of animal products in an effort to tackle climate change. Understanding hip fracture risk in vegetarians is therefore becoming increasingly important to public health, said researchers from the University of Leeds. In the study, published in the journal BMC Medicine, the team investigated the risk of hip fracture in occasional meat-eaters, pescatarians (people who eat fish but not meat), and vegetarians compared to regular meat-eaters. Among 26,318 women, 822 hip fracture cases were observed over roughly 20 years. After adjustment for factors such as smoking and age, vegetarians were the only diet group with an elevated risk of hip fracture. "Our study highlights potential concerns regarding risk of hip fracture in women who have a vegetarian diet. However, it is not warning people to abandon vegetarian diets. As with any diet, it is important to understand personal circumstances and what nutrients are needed for a balanced healthy lifestyle," said lead author James Webster, a doctoral researcher from the School of Food Science and Nutrition at Leeds. Vegetarian diets can vary widely from person to person and can be healthy or unhealthy, just like diets that include animal products. However, it is concerning that vegetarian diets often have lower intakes of nutrients that are linked with bone and muscle health. These types of nutrients generally are more abundant in meat and other animal products than in plants, such as protein, calcium, and other micronutrients. "Low intake of these nutrients can lead to lower bone mineral density and muscle mass, which can make you more susceptible to hip fracture risk. This makes it especially important for further research to better understand factors driving the increased risk in vegetarians, whether it be particular nutrient deficiencies or weight management, so that we can help people to make healthy choices," Webster said. The research team also found that the average Body Mass Index among vegetarians was slightly lower than the average among the regular meat eaters. Previous research has shown a link between low BMI and a high risk of hip fracture. Lower BMI can indicate people are underweight, which can mean poorer bone and muscle health, and higher risk of hip fracture. Further investigation is needed to determine if low BMI is the reason for the observed higher risk in vegetarians, the team said.Also Read: Monsoon health care: Expert explains how to prevent vaginal infections This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

13 August,2022 06:51 PM IST | London | IANS
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Teen girls more likely to find it difficult to give up social media than boys

Social media has taken over the lives of people across age groups and now they feel the need to be on it all the time. A new survey by the Pew Research Centre in the US, has found that teen girls find it more difficult to quit social media platforms like TikTok, Instagram, Facebook and YouTube than teen boys. When asked about the idea of giving up social media, 54 per cent of teens say it would be at least somewhat hard to give it up, while 46 per cent say it would be at least somewhat easy."Teen girls are more likely than teen boys to express it would be difficult to give up social media (58 per cent vs 49 per cent)," the survey findings showed.Conversely, a quarter of teen boys say giving up social media would be very easy, while 15 per cent of teen girls say the same."Older teens also say they would have difficulty giving up social media. About six-in-ten teens ages 15 to 17 say giving up social media would be at least somewhat difficult to do. A smaller share of 13- to 14-year-olds think this would be difficult," the survey revealed.When reflecting on the amount of time they spend on social media generally, a majority of US teens (55 per cent) say they spend about the right amount of time on these apps and sites, while about a third of teens (36 per cent) say they spend too much time on social media.Beyond just online platforms, the vast majority of teens have access to digital devices, such as smartphones (95 per cent), desktop or laptop computers (90 per cent) and gaming consoles (80 per cent).The study shows there has been an uptick in daily teen internet users, from 92 per cent in 2014-15 to 97 per cent today.In addition, the share of teens who say they are online almost constantly has roughly doubled since 2014-15.While teens' access to smartphones has increased over roughly the past eight years, their access to other digital technologies, such as desktop or laptop computers or gaming consoles, has remained statistically unchanged, the survey said.Also Read: What the lack of social interaction takes away from the college experience This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

13 August,2022 06:06 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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Why fitness enthusiasts need to follow rules to maintain heart health

Exercise is known to be beneficial for the body and fitness. However, it may not always be ideal because of existing health conditions, and experts say fitness enthusiasts must be mindful of especially their heart while taking up a fitness regime. Stand-up comedian Raju Srivastav was reportedly running on the treadmill when he suffered a cardiac arrest and was rushed to the All India Institute of Medical Science, Delhi. Srivastav, 59, continues to be "critical and on ventilator". "If someone above the age of 50 years is starting to go to the gym, then it may be better to get yourself checked by a cardiologist or do a stress test," said Dr Tilak Suvarna, senior interventional cardiologist, Asian Heart Institute, Mumbai. "Avoid overdoing any exercise. Moderate exercise is good enough to reduce your risk of a heart attack," he said, adding that work out should be immediately stopped if one "gets symptoms of chest pain or shortness of breath or light-headedness while working out. "One should also keep well-hydrated and avoid going to the gym on a full stomach," he advised. While obesity, sedentary lifestyles, and old age are traditionally existing reasons for heart ailments, health experts suggest increased workouts, stress, and Covid, are adding to the risk. Post Covid, heart attacks have been significantly on the rise, especially in celebrities often touted as fit and healthy. 'Bhabiji Ghar Par Hai' actor Deepesh Bhan (41), Marathi actor Pradeep Patwardhan (65), singer K.K. (53), Kannada superstar Puneeth Rajkumar (46), 'Balika Vadhu' actor Sidharth Shukla (40) are in the list of celebrities who lost their lives to heart attack.  "Post-Covid, there has been a rise in heart attack or cardiac arrest cases among people during a gym workout. Youngsters and middle-aged people are at the most risk as they are more likely to be the victims in such cases," said Dr Ashish Agarwal, HOD Cardiology, Aakash healthcare. "Going to the gym does not imply that your heart is in good shape. Many fitness enthusiasts, irrespective of age, use steroids or synthetic proteins which are not safe at all. Also, engaging in an intense workout or too much physical activity too quickly can injure the heart, especially in beginners or people above 40," he added. Agarwal advised people with hypertension, high cholesterol, or diabetes, to consult a cardiologist before beginning gym training. "Heart attack cases were on the rise even before Covid arrived. However, it is a significant risk factor because it raises the likelihood of blood clot development in patients suffering from long Covid. However, individual cases may differ," he noted.Also Read: Young adults need to beware of heart attacks post-Covid-19, here’s why This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

13 August,2022 05:47 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
For more than 18 months now, senior college students have not gone back to campus and as a result have missed out on a big part of their socialising experience in college. Image for representational purpose only. Photo: istock

What the lack of social interaction takes away from the college experience

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Schools in Mumbai reopened in a phased manner earlier in the week for the first time since March 2020 amid the new normal. With Class 8 to Class 12 being the first to return to classrooms, junior college -- which falls into that classification -- has resumed too. However, for senior college students, classes have remained online so far. The uncertainty over when they will be able to get back on campus still lurks.  While some introverted college-goers may be enjoying the new virtual way of life, it has largely hampered the social interactions of many. That has certainly been the case for Kaneena Venugopal, a second year management studies student who started senior college in 2020. “Considering that I haven’t even been to my degree college and I’m already halfway through this course, I do miss just being on campus with friends. Especially because I was very active in junior college with cultural festivals and everything,” she explains. With the ongoing uncertainty, Venugopal is unsure how she will cope when she finally attends college in person, as she has become accustomed to not travelling and attending lectures online. Venugopal is one among many in the city who are living through this experience. They are missing out on meeting peers, building close friendships, and sharing ideas through physical interactions. Typically, it is these interactions that help shape their thinking and social circle over the course of their studies and even for the rest of their lives. For more than 18 months now, senior college students have not gone back to campus. Mid-day.com reached out to Dr Kersi Chavda, consultant psychiatrist at PD Hinduja Hospital & MRC to understand why the social aspect of college life is important and how students can deal in its absence. Beyond the academic aspect of college, why is the social aspect important for students? When students are out in college, they are meeting people, interacting with them, going for coffee and doing things in groups. It is an important part of socialising as it keeps them busy. However, that has not been possible. Kids have been meeting on Zoom but that is not the same as meeting friends in person and having fun. The skills they learn in college like learning to get up on time, work under pressure, wait for your turn, learn new skills and upgrade them are useful in the future. They have to learn how to work in a team, which is often done while working on college projects. Each one has to do their part and if one doesn’t, then the project gets affected. Sometimes, you have bullies in the group, who throw their weight around and take advantage, which is seen later in life in workplaces too. There are also mentors who are bullies and toxic, who believe that shouting is the only way to get work done, which is also seen later on the job. Students learn all about how to cope with such situations in college and it stands them in good stead when they deal with the outside world. It is why their social life is so important when they are in college.  What have been some of the mental challenges for college students during the asocial pandemic period?Since they were at home and unable to meet people, it led to a surge in anxiety, depression and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). There was an increase in aggression too during the Covid-19 pandemic. It is also a time when there is a hormonal surge for which physical activity in the form of exercise can help but even all of that stopped. There has been a slight increase in addiction to drugs and alcohol too.  For those who were in junior college and wanted to get into a professional college or a particular college of their choice, there has been a lot of uncertainty about how they will be doing their course. It led to a lot of anxiety. However, unfortunately, the part that has sustained them has been that the whole world is in the same situation and there are lakhs of children out there facing the same problem, so they are not singled out.  There has also been access to so much social media. They land up being on the internet for a long time, including watching pornography. There is also body shaming because they have been at home and haven’t been going out and have put on weight and people aren’t too kind to them and that ends up being terrible for a person's self-esteem. The kids with special needs or a disability who are going to college have been most affected. With the lockdown, it is extremely difficult to get whatever experiences they need through a computer. They need a person to interact with. For a while, there are going to be these students who are going to be at a disadvantage. Have college-goers been missing the sense of community that comes from extra-curricular activities such as annual festivals, film club, book club, etc.? Being a part of clubs in any form is useful because you tend to interact with people and humans, by and large, should be social animals. But because of Covid-19, socialisation has become less. Very often, one has to work towards being social and your body has to be allowed to be trained to be social and occasionally that does not happen. When a student goes back into a social situation after they have got used to being alone, it can cause anxiety. It can even happen when they are trying to interact with friends on a personal level.     What are ways that students can keep busy till the uncertainty prevails and how can they prepare for in-person college?Physical activity is known to help at every age group. In addition to all the physical benefits, it helps channelise a lot of negative energy and reduces the possibility of inappropriate behaviour. Students have to understand by themselves that eventually they will have to socialise and that there will be ups and downs. There will have to be the process of acceptance that “Okay, I am going to feel anxious but for me to get over it, I have to do more of the thing than less of it”. For example, if a person is scared of the dark and will never go into a dark room, they will never get over that fear of darkness but if they do go into the room, then they will get less and less frightened of it and overall the fear will go away. Now if a person is frightened of getting out of the house, the more they go out, the less they will be frightened about it and very often that is all that is necessary. For those getting ready to go back to college, it will help if they visualise themselves getting into the college situation, feeling the anxiety but allowing yourself to cope with it. Imagination is very often much worse than reality and you realise that you may not be as anxious as you thought you would be. How can colleges and teachers help students adjust to all these changes?College is a place to get an education and now that that education has been affected, the teachers may rush with what they have to do. On the other hand, students will be a little rusty and will take time to get into the normal groove again. Teachers will have to be available and watchful and if they see signs of mental health illness, they should take the necessary steps to help. How important is it for colleges to focus on counselling going forward? Most colleges would have access to counsellors now. So, it would be a good idea to have an orientation for the students when they go back to college for in-person classes. Start by talking to them about mental health. If they have the symptoms of anxiety, depression and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), they have to be told that it isn’t a sign that you are weak if you seek help and that people aren’t going to laugh at you.   Also Read: How parents and students can prepare for in-person classes in the new normal

12 August,2022 04:29 PM IST | Mumbai | Nascimento Pinto
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Mumbai rains: Tips to tackle hair-damage during monsoon

After enduring the oppressive heat of summer, we are all in agreement that the monsoon season is pure delight. It is a warm experience to travel to a local hill station in the rain and chilly air. During the monsoons, we often enjoy our lazy weekends by practicing self-care and simply concentrating on how to improve our bodies and skin. Not only do we neglect our haircare regimen, but it frequently falls lower on the priority list. Although we have liked getting soaked in the rain throughout the monsoon season, it will soon come to an end. This has been the most difficult time of year to take care of our hair. Our hair becomes frizzy, dry, loses its lustre, and develops dandruff and an itchy scalp as a result of rising air humidity and improper haircare practices. These symptoms are all telltale signs of hair damage. Okay, we've seen enough to know that this season makes our hair more vulnerable to damage, but surely we can take preventative measures when the time is right? So here are five strategies to cure monsoon-related hair damage. Apply aloe vera and green-tea based oil Do you recall the "nuska" your grandmother used? "Your Hair is ready to travel; just apply oil." Making oiling a regular part of your hair care routine will help prepare your hair. Twice a week, apply hair oil before shampooing to strengthen hair strands from the roots, lessen frizz, and avoid hair breakage. To help repair the damage and make it smooth, silky, and bouncy, it's crucial to choose an oil with caring components such as plant-based extracts of aloe vera and green tea. Regular champi once a week The scalp can benefit greatly from a 15-minute champi, which is similar to a spa treatment and one of the greatest ways to heal damaged hair. It enhances the oil's ability to penetrate the skin and deliver its active elements, speeding up blood circulation and hair growth. Reduce the use of hard water The quality of the water decreases during the monsoon season due to the high concentration of minerals in hard water, such as calcium and magnesium, which coats the hair and prevents moisture from penetrating, causing damage over time. Reduce the number of times you wash your hair since harsh water causes it to become dry and crinkly and cause significant hair loss. The other option is to use a filter to remove the hard water and stop the harm. The best way is to towel-dry your hair Use the towel-dry method rather than blow-drying your hair as this may cause it to become more frizzy and dry. After shampooing, it is ideal to dry your hair with a microfibre towel. Instead of vigorously combing your damp hair, gently squeeze it and fold it into a turban to maintain your stylish hairstyle for 15 minutes. Use the right comb When you attempt to comb through tangles after washing your hair, you risk significant damage. Because of how delicate your wet hair is, brushing it vigorously might cause hair loss. It's preferable to towel-dry your hair before using a wide-toothed comb, jade comb, or wooden comb as these will be less harsh on your strands. Also read:  Monsoon Skincare and Haircare Tips by an expert This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

12 August,2022 03:46 PM IST | Mumbai | IANS
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Consuming multivitamins daily may be of no use: Study

For those who are used to taking multivitamins every morning, a new study has revealed that consuming them may actually be of no use. While multivitamins aren't helpful, at least they're not harmful. But the money people spend on them could be better spent on purchasing healthy foods, according to Dr. Pieter Cohen, an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Researchers analysed 84 studies involving nearly 700,000 people. Their review, published in JAMA, found little or no evidence that taking vitamin and mineral supplements helps prevent cancer and cardiovascular disease that can lead to heart attacks and stroke, nor do they help prevent an early death. "Most people would be better off just drinking a full glass of water and skipping the vitamin," said Cohen, an expert in dietary supplement research and regulation. "We have good evidence that for the vast majority of people, taking multivitamins won't help you," he added. There are some exceptions, however. Highly restrictive diets and gastrointestinal conditions, or certain weight-loss surgeries that cause poor nutrient absorption, are examples of reasons why a multivitamin or individual vitamins might be recommended. A daily vitamin D supplement may be necessary when a person gets insufficient sun exposure. Your doctor may recommend an iron supplement if you have a low red blood cell count (anaemia). Surveys suggest people take vitamins to stay healthy, feel more energetic, or gain peace of mind. These beliefs stem from a powerful narrative about vitamins being healthy and natural that dates back nearly a century. "This narrative appeals to many groups in our population, including people who are progressive vegetarians and also to conservatives who are suspicious about science and think that doctors are up to no good," Cohen said. Vitamins are very inexpensive to make, so the companies can sink lots of money into advertising, he noted. But because the FDA regulates dietary supplements as food and not as prescription or over-the-counter drugs, the agency only monitors claims regarding the treatment of disease. For example, supplement makers cannot say that their product "lowers heart disease risk". But their labels are allowed to include phrases such as "promotes a healthy heart" or "supports immunity", as well as vague promises about improving fatigue and low motivation. "Supplement manufacturers are allowed to market their products as if they have benefits when no benefit actually exists. It's enshrined into the law," Cohen said. It's wise to note the legally required disclaimer on each product: "These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease," he advised. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

11 August,2022 07:02 PM IST | New York | IANS
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Rise in temperatures at night may up risk of death by six times: Study

The various effects of climate change are slowly being learned as scientists around the world work on its impact in the future. A new global study has now warned that the rising night-time temperatures will actually affect our health in the future. It states that the changing temperature will actually increase the risk of death by nearly six-fold in the future because of heat that disrupts normal sleeping patterns. Excessively hot nights caused by climate change are predicted to increase the mortality rate around the world by up to 60 per cent by the end of the century, according to researchers from China, South Korea, Japan, Germany and the US.Ambient heat during the night may interrupt the normal physiology of sleep, and less sleep can lead to immune system damage and a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, chronic illnesses, inflammation and mental health conditions, said the study published in The Lancet Planetary Health."The risks of increasing temperature at night were frequently neglected," said study co-author Yuqiang Zhang, a climate scientist from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the US."The frequency and mean intensity of hot nights would increase more than 30 per cent and 60 per cent by the 2100s, respectively, compared with less than 20 per cent increase for the daily mean temperature," said Zhang from the department of environmental sciences and Engineering at the Gillings School.Results show that the average intensity of hot night events will nearly double by 2090, from 20.4 degree Celsius to 39.7 degree Celsius across 28 cities from east Asia, increasing the burden of disease due to excessive heat that disrupts normal sleeping patternsThis is the first study to estimate the impact of hotter nights on climate change-related mortality risk.The findings showed that the burden of mortality could be significantly higher than estimated by average daily temperature increase, suggesting that warming from climate change could have a troubling impact, even under restrictions from the Paris Climate Agreement.The team estimated the mortality due to excess heat in 28 cities in China, South Korea and Japan between 1980 and 2015 and applied it to two climate change modelling scenarios that aligned with carbon-reduction scenarios adapted by the respective national governments.Through this model, the team was able to estimate that between 2016 and 2100, the risk of death from excessively hot nights would increase nearly six-fold.This prediction is much higher than the mortality risk from daily average warming suggested by climate change models."From our study, we highlight that, in assessing the disease burden due to non-optimum temperature, governments and local policymakers should consider the extra health impacts of the disproportional intra-day temperature variations," said Haidong Kan, a professor at Fudan University in China.Since the study only included 28 cities from three countries, Zhang said that "extrapolation of these results to the whole East Asia region or other regions should be cautious".Also Read: Climate change has an impact on over 200 human pathogenic diseases: Study This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

10 August,2022 04:46 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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Covid-19 lockdown led to suicidal thoughts among people: Study

The lockdowns during the Covid-19 pandemic had a significant effect on levels of suicidal ideation, says a new study published in the journal Open Medicine. The study indicated suicidal ideation, which involves someone thinking about or wishing for their own death, significantly increased in the 2020 post-lockdown patients compared with the 2018 and 2019 patients. "Suicide prevention in the Covid-19 era is an important and difficult issue," the authors, including lead author Suzana Tosic Golubovic of the University of Nis in Serbia, stated. "Further research studies are needed to find out how mental health consequences can be mitigated during and after the Covid-19 pandemic," they added. During the lockdown, loss of social contacts and employment, economic worries, fear of illness, feelings of isolation and reduced access to psychiatric treatment acted as stressors that could exacerbate a mental illness or even prompt such illness in previously healthy individuals. For the study, published in the journal Open Medicine, the team examined patient records in a psychiatric clinic in Serbia and asked patients about their experience of the pandemic. The researchers investigated patients who were admitted to the clinic between May and August 2020, which was just after Serbia had come out of a lockdown. They then compared these patients with patients admitted during the same months in 2018 and 2019. Suicide attempts also increased in the 2020 patients, although this trend was not statistically significant. The 2020 patients also showed higher levels of adjustment disorder, in which patients have difficulty adjusting to a stressful situation or event in their life. Patients who had attempted suicide in 2020 were more likely to be exposed to information about the pandemic on social media and were more likely to present with adjustment disorder and major depressive disorder. Strikingly, 60 per cent of the patients who had attempted suicide in 2020 had never received psychiatric treatment before, which was a significantly higher proportion than in the patients who attempted suicide in 2019. Also read: Why exclusive breastfeeding is still difficult for many mothers This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

10 August,2022 12:07 PM IST | Mumbai | IANS
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Fatigue, headache among top symptoms of long Covid-19: Study

Fatigue and headache are the most common symptoms reported by individuals on an average of over four months out from Covid-19 infection, finds a study published in the journal 'ScienceDirect'. The study reported preliminary findings from 200 patients enrolled on an average about 125 days after testing positive for coronavirus. Eighty per cent of all the participants reported neurological symptoms with fatigue, the most common symptom, reported by 68.5 per cent, and headache close behind at 66.5 per cent. A reason fatigue appears to be such a major factor among those who had Covid-19 is potentially because levels of inflammation, the body's natural response to an infection, remain elevated in some individuals, explained researchers from the Medical College of Georgia in the US. The findings indicate that even though the antibodies to the virus itself may wane, persistent inflammation is contributing to some of the symptoms like fatigue, said Elizabeth Rutkowski, neurologist from the College. She noted that patients with conditions like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, both considered autoimmune conditions that consequently also have high levels of inflammation, also include fatigue as a top symptom. "They have body fatigue where they feel short of breath, they go to get the dishes done and they are feeling palpitations, they immediately have to sit down and they feel muscle soreness like they just ran a mile or more," Rutkowski said. "There is probably some degree of neurologic fatigue as well because patients also have brain fog, they say it hurts to think, to read even a single email and that their brain is just wiped out," she added. The study also found muscle aches, cough, changes in smell and taste, fever, chills and nasal congestion in the long list of lingering symptoms. Just over half reported changes in smell (54.5 per cent) and taste (54 per cent) and nearly half the participants (47 per cent) met the criteria for mild cognitive impairment, with 30 per cent demonstrating impaired vocabulary and 32 per cent having impaired working memory. Twenty-one per cent reported confusion, and hypertension was the most common medical condition reported by participants in addition to their bout with Covid. "Our results support the growing evidence that there are chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms following Covid-19 infections," Rutkowski said. Problems like these as well as mild cognitive impairment and even impaired vocabulary may also reflect the long-term isolation Covid-19 produced for many individuals, Rutkowski said. Neuropsychiatric symptoms are observed in the acute phase of infection, but there is a need for accurate characterisation of how symptoms evolve over time, the researchers said. Also read: Ring vaccination method may not be effective in containing monkeypox infections: Study This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

09 August,2022 12:17 PM IST | New York | IANS
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Pedal for a healthy lifestyle: Benefits of cycling you did not know of

In recent years, the culture of cycling has gained tremendous momentum in our country. Cycling is fun, healthy and a low-impact form of workout for all ages. It's a wonderful workout that keeps you activated both mentally and physically and help boosts immunity. The adrenaline rush that one receives while pedalling through different terrains also makes cycling an adventure. For anyone who still needs a reason to take the bicycle for a spin, Sriram Sundresan, CEO, of Firefox Bikes shares some of the benefits of cycling: Weight loss: Weight gain due to a sedentary lifestyle is a common problem these days. Riding short distances to the neighbourhood shop, school, or work are mini-workouts you can sneak into your routine and an effective strategy for weight loss. Not only would this ensure that you are physically active, but these pedalling sessions would also help in torching fat. Approximately 45-60 minutes of cycling can help burn up to 300 calories. Prevention of lifestyle diseases: Cycling regularly helps keep various health issues like diabetes, obesity, cardiac problems, or other lifestyle disorders at bay. Regular cycling has in fact proved to keep blood sugar levels in check. Cycling works as an effective stress buster, in essence, it definitely helps in mental well-being. Reduces depression and anxiety: The benefits of riding a bicycle extend beyond physical fitness. Cycling gets you outdoor, among nature, leaving you to feel revitalised, energetic and optimistic. Depression, anxiety and stress are all positively affected by exercise, but the combination of exercise and exposure to the outdoors is a bit of a magic combination for emotional and mental well-being. So, hop onto your saddle and soak up some sunshine and positive vibes. After all, a happy soul is a healthy soul. Builds muscle: The resistance element of cycling means that it just doesn't burn fat, but it also builds your hamstrings, quads and calves and can also tone your calves, preserve muscle mass and strengthen your core. Keeps your heart healthy: Cycling and cardiovascular fitness go hand in hand. Cycling on a regular basis keeps your heart healthy and is considered a great cardiovascular activity. Regular cycling stimulates and improves your heart, lungs and circulation, reducing your risk of cardiovascular diseases and also slowing down ageing. Boosts immunity: One of the rising concerns in the present times is keeping ourselves safe, ensuring that we have the immunity we need. Cycling daily helps with keeping your physical health in check, increases your stamina, and helps keep the immune system young. In general, the fitter you are, the stronger is your immune system. Also read: New study warns how rising global temperatures may affect children's fitness levels This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

09 August,2022 11:54 AM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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New study warns how rising global temperatures may affect children's fitness

Poor physical fitness has a lot of disadvantages and a new comprehensive review of studies has now warned that because of record levels of obesity and physical activity among children, they are set to bear the brunt amid rising global temperatures. While physical fitness is key to tolerating higher temperatures, children are more obese and less fit than ever before, argues Dr Shawnda Morrison, an environmental exercise physiologist, from Slovenia's University of Ljubljana. This could put them at greater risk of suffering heat-related health problems, such as dehydration, heat cramps, heat exhaustion or heat stroke. She noted that current climate change policies fail to adequately address child health needs and that encouraging children to make exercise part of their everyday lives must be prioritised if they are to cope with living in a hotter world. In the peer-reviewed journal Temperature, her team assessed a comprehensive review of over 150 medical and scientific studies into how children maintain physical activity, exercise, cope with heat, and how this might change as global temperatures rise. The research, she highlights includes a study of 457 primary school 5-12 year old boys in Thailand, which found that overweight youngsters were more than twice as likely to have difficulty regulating their body temperature as those of normal weight when exercising outdoors. In another study, data from emergency departments at children's hospitals in the US, found attendance was higher during hotter days. Younger children were particularly likely to need emergency care. The research also found children's aerobic fitness is 30 per cent lower than that of their parents at the same age. There are rapid declines in children's physical activity globally, especially over the last 30 years. Most children are not meeting the World Health Organization's guideline of performing an average of at least 60 minutes of physical activity each day. Physical inactivity was accelerated, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic when schools and other societal infrastructures were closed. Higher temperatures and changes in weather patterns are projected to also lead to outbreaks of new diseases entering the human population. If there are more movement restrictions put in place to contain the novel diseases, this will have potentially devastating consequences to children's physical fitness, mental and physical health. "Yet, as the world warms, children are the least fit they have ever been. It is imperative that children are encouraged to do daily physical activity to build up, and maintain, their fitness, so that they enjoy moving their bodies and it doesn't feel like 'work' or 'a chore' to them," Morrison said.Also Read: Why exclusive breastfeeding is still difficult for many mothers This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

08 August,2022 07:45 PM IST | London | IANS
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