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Depression around childbirth linked to future heart risk: Study

Women who are diagnosed with depression around the time they give birth appear to have a higher risk of heart problems in later life, according to a new study.   Those diagnosed with perinatal depression -- which includes postnatal depression and depression during pregnancy -- may be at higher risk of heart problems including high blood pressure; heart disease and heart failure for up to 20 years afterwards. Swedish researchers said that the links between depression around childbirth and the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease are “largely unknown” as they published a study tracking women for more than a decade. The study, published in the European Heart Journal, examined data on almost 56,000 women diagnosed with perinatal depression between 2001 and 2014. Their information was matched to almost 546,000 who had babies during the same time period who were not diagnosed with perinatal depression. The women were tracked an average of 10 years, with some monitored for up to 20 years after diagnosis. Some 6.4 per cent of women with perinatal depression were diagnosed with cardiovascular disease during the follow-up, compared to 3.7 per cent of those who were not diagnosed with depression. Researchers found that those diagnosed with perinatal depression had a 36 per cent increased risk of cardiovascular disease during the follow-up period. Women diagnosed with depression before childbirth had a 29 per cent increased risk, while those diagnosed with postnatal depression had a 42 per cent higher odds of developing heart disease, they found. The results were “most pronounced” in women who had not suffered depression before pregnancy, the authors said. They said the elevated risk was found across all types of cardiovascular disease, drawing particular attention to the increased odds of women developing ischemic heart disease, heart failure and high blood pressure. "Our findings may help identify people who are at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease so that steps can be taken to reduce this risk," said Dr Emma Brann, from the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. “We know that perinatal depression is both preventable and treatable, and for many people it’s the first episode of depression they’ve ever experienced," Brann said. "Our findings provide more reason for ensuring maternal care is holistic, with equal attention on both physical and mental health. It remains unclear how and through what pathways perinatal depression leads to cardiovascular disease. “We need to do more research to understand this so that we can find the best ways to prevent depression and lower the risk of CVD." Academics also analysed data on sisters, where available, and found that the increased risk of developing CVD remained in the sister who experienced perinatal depression compared with her sister who had not experienced it. Women who suffered perinatal depression had a 20 per cent higher risk of heart disease compared to their sisters. “The slightly lower difference in risk between sisters suggests that there could be genetic or familial factors partly involved,” Dr Brann said. “There could also be other factors involved, as is the case for the link between other forms of depression and CVD. These include alterations in the immune system, oxidative stress and lifestyle changes implicated in major depression,” Dr Brann concluded. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

19 June,2024 04:13 PM IST | London | IANS
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Adding nuts to weight loss diets could help achieve goal early: Study

Adding nuts to a calorie-controlled weight loss diet does not hinder weight reduction but may have the opposite effect, a new study said on Tuesday.  The study conducted by the University of South Australia (UniSA) analysed the findings of seven randomised controlled trials that assessed weight changes and glycaemic control in energy-restrictive (ER) diets. The researchers found that none of the studies produced an adverse effect to weight loss when nuts were included as part of the diet. According to UniSA researcher Professor Alison Coates, nuts are a nutrient-rich food that should be included in weight-loss diets. "People often avoid nuts when trying to lose weight because they think that the energy and fat content in nuts can contribute to weight gain,” said Prof Coates. Four out of the seven studies analysed by the researchers showed that people who ate 42-84 grams of nuts as part of an ER diet achieved significantly more weight loss than those on ER diets without nuts. Weight loss from the ‘nut-enriched’ ER diets achieved an extra 1.4-7.4 kg which may be related to the ability of nuts to help curb hunger efficiently. "If weight gain was a concern discouraging people from eating nuts -- rest assured that this is not the case. Nuts do not cause weight gain. Furthermore, they do not adversely affect weight loss, rather they appear to assist it," said Prof Coates. According to Dr Sharayah Carter, co-author of the study, “For those who enjoy eating nuts, knowing that they can help meet weight loss goals, while also improving overall health is a huge plus. “It’s also great for health professionals who can be confident in recommending nuts, in the context of a healthy diet, without concerns of an adverse effect on weight." This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

19 June,2024 03:55 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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53 pc of adults with ADHD chose to keep quiet about their diagnosis: Study

About 53 per cent of adults with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) chose to keep their diagnosis to themselves, with 66 per cent of young women (aged 18–34) choosing to remain silent compared to 42 per cent of young men, signalling an inherent societal bias.  According to the non-profit organisation Understood.org, about 63 per cent of adults with a learning or thinking difference wish they had been diagnosed earlier in life. The study surveyed 2,000 adults in the US aged over 18. The study also found that most adults (56 per cent) agreed that women with ADHD were perceived differently than men with ADHD, including three in four women with ADHD (75 per cent) who feel this way. As per Laura Key, VP of content strategy and co-leader of the women's initiative at Understood.org, women with ADHD are considerably more likely to be "undiagnosed, misdiagnosed, and misunderstood" than men. In addition, the study found that about 58 per cent of adults know that women are just as likely to have ADHD as men, yet many have misconceptions about ADHD in women. A notable 75 per cent of adults were unaware that women with ADHD were less likely to be diagnosed than men, and 72 per cent were unaware that they were more likely to be misdiagnosed than men. The study also revealed that 87 per cent of people were unaware of bias against women in ADHD testing tools. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

18 June,2024 10:04 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
Veteran Bollywood singer Alka Yagnik revealed that she has been diagnosed with a

What's this 'rare sensory hearing loss' singer Alka Yagnik was diagnosed with?

Veteran Bollywood singer Alka Yagnik, who revealed that she has been diagnosed with a "rare sensory hearing loss" due to a viral attack, has suffered a type of hearing loss caused by damage to the inner ear or the nerve pathways that transmit sound from the ear to the brain.  According to Dr Manish Munjal, vice chairman, ENT, Sir Ganga Ram Hospital in Delhi, sudden sensory hearing loss is a medical emergency as it can become irreversible if not aggressively treated in 48-72 hours. "The centre of the problem is the inner ear organ called Cochlea, where it happens due to damage to the hair cells," Munjal said on Tuesday. The causes may range from simple viruses like Herpes, Varicella, and Mumps or sudden loud exposure to noise levels above 85 decibel (dB). Munjal also mentioned that this disorder may also result from more serious causes like painkiller overdose, chemotherapy, tumour compression, meningitis and stroke. "The need of the hour is usually to rush to an ENT specialist to get the necessary ear examination done as well as get an audiometry test. Once diagnosed, the treatment may require a cocktail of antivirals, oral and intratympanic steroids, as well as rest from noisy environments," he stated. According to the doctor, once the treatment is initiated, the chances of recovery are usually 70 per cent and above. The disorder affects only 1 per cent in bilateral ears as compared to single ear, Munjal noted. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

18 June,2024 09:36 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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Robotic surgery removes complex tumour between newly-wed's bladder and uterus

Using cutting-edge robotic technology, doctors at the Sir Ganga Ram Hospital have removed a complex tumour located between the bladder and the uterus of a young woman.  The 6x5x4 cm tumour in the pocket between her bladder and uterus was discovered during a routine ultrasound. The Department of Urology and Robotic Surgery of the hospital determined that the tumour's exact nature could not be confirmed through imaging or biopsy due to its difficult location. “The challenges in this surgery were immense. We had to remove the tumour without affecting the uterus, bladder, or ureter -- all while avoiding a large incision that could complicate the patient's future pregnancy plans,” said Vipin Tyagi, the lead surgeon. Tyagi and his team hence opted for a robotic-assisted surgery. The advanced robotic system allowed for unparalleled precision, flexibility, and control throughout the delicate operation. “The robotic technology was essential in accessing this difficult pocket between the organs and removing the tumor without any collateral damage," the surgeon said. Following the successful surgery, the newly-wed patient was discharged from the hospital just two days later – with her fertility preserved, said the hospital. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

18 June,2024 11:13 AM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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Chronic high BP during pregnancy doubled between 2008 and 2021 in US: Study

The number of individuals who had chronic hypertension or chronic high blood pressure during pregnancy doubled between 2008 and 2021 in the US, researchers said on Monday.   Treatment rates for chronic hypertension during pregnancy remained relatively low but stable during the same time, with only about 60 per cent of the individuals receiving (filling prescriptions for) antihypertensive medications, according to the new research published in Hypertension, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association.  Chronic hypertension in pregnancy is defined as high blood pressure diagnosed before pregnancy or before 20 weeks of pregnancy. Preeclampsia typically begins after 20 weeks of pregnancy, can cause liver or kidney damage, and may double a woman’s chances for future heart failure and other cardiovascular complications.  "While the rate of hypertension in pregnancy has doubled, the use of medication for treatment remained stable at only 60 per cent, which we believe is likely below what it should be if patients are treated according to clinical guidelines," said lead study author Stephanie Leonard from Stanford University’s School of Medicine.  In 2017, clinical guidelines from the American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology revised the thresholds to diagnose high blood pressure from 140/90 mm Hg to 130/80 mm Hg for stage 1, and from 160/110 mm Hg to 140/90 mm Hg for stage 2 hypertension.  "We had hoped to see some impact from the 2017 guideline, which reduced the blood pressure threshold for treatment of hypertension. We were surprised to not find any meaningful changes from before and after the guideline," said Leonard.  This study highlights the growing burden of chronic hypertension and poor cardiovascular health pre-pregnancy as critical targets to improve maternal health, said the researchers.  This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

17 June,2024 07:47 PM IST | New York | IANS
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Treatment for stress-induced exhaustion disorder needs to be relooked: Research

Traditional treatment can tend to overlook important psychological and social aspects of stress-induced exhaustion disorder, researchers said on Monday, adding that the concept of stress needs to be discussed from a new perspective.  Despite stress being central to human development, the focus is often on the negative aspects of stress. A new thesis at Uppsala University in Sweden questioned the traditional view of stress-induced exhaustion disorder and introduced a new model that puts more focus on meaningfulness rather than recovery. “There are no established evidence-based models for the psychological treatment of stress-induced exhaustion disorder. The concepts of ‘recovery’ and ‘stress’ are so widely accepted in our current era that it is difficult to examine them critically,” said Jakob Clason van de Leur from the Department of Psychology at Uppsala University. It’s easy to think that patients with stress-related exhaustion should prioritise rest and relaxation. "But an overly one-sided focus on recovery can lead to a passive existence that it’s easy to get stuck in and can instead become harmful over time,” van de Leur added. He has followed 915 patients with stress-related exhaustion who have participated in comprehensive rehabilitation programmes, including medical, psychological, and physiotherapeutic methods. While the results are positive, he said this approach is relatively ineffective overall. “The treatments used to last up to one year when I started - now we are working on a 12-week digital programme,” van de Leur informed. Despite being a small study, "the results show similar effects to our previous six-month treatment programme, using only a quarter of the clinical resources. This means that the treatment can be made available to more patients in the healthcare system,” the researchers explained. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

17 June,2024 07:11 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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Eating junk food like samosa, burger when stressed out can fuel anxiety: Study

Eating junk food like a samosa or burger when feeling stressed out can actually elevate anxiety levels, researchers said on Monday.   When under stress, people tend to turn to high-calorie food for solace. The study by researchers at University of Colorado at Boulder found that in animals, a high-fat diet disrupts resident gut bacteria, alters behaviour and influences brain chemicals in ways that increase anxiety. Lead author Christopher Lowry, a professor of integrative physiology at CU Boulder, said that to think that just a high-fat diet could alter expression of these genes in the brain is extraordinary. “The high-fat group essentially had the molecular signature of a high anxiety state in their brain,” Lowry added in the study published in the journal Biological Research. Throughout the study, the researchers assessed the animals’ microbiome, or gut bacteria. When compared to the control group, the group eating a high-fat diet gained weight. But the animals also showed significantly less diversity of gut bacteria. The high-fat diet group also showed higher expression of three genes involved in production and signaling of the neurotransmitter serotonin, which is associated with stress and anxiety. While serotonin is often called a “feel-good brain chemical,” certain subsets of serotonin neurons can, when activated, prompt anxiety-like responses in animals. Lowry suspects that an unhealthy microbiome compromises the gut lining, enabling bacteria to slip into the body’s circulation and communicate with the brain via the vagus nerve, a pathway from the gastrointestinal tract to the brain. “If you think about human evolution, it makes sense,” Lowry said. “We are hard-wired to really notice things that make us sick so we can avoid those things in the future.” Not all fats are bad, and healthy fats like those found in fish, olive oil, nuts and seeds can be anti-inflammatory and good for the brain, said researchers. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever.

17 June,2024 06:51 PM IST | New Delhi | IANS
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New device spots life-threatening infections in cancer patients remotely

US-based firm Leuko, founded by a research team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), has developed a device that will give doctors a non-invasive way to monitor cancer patients' health during chemotherapy -- without the need of blood tests.   Chemotherapy and other treatments that take down cancer cells can also destroy patients' immune cells. In some cases, the patient's white blood cell (WBC) count gets dangerously low, a condition known as neutropenia, and the only way for doctors to monitor their patient's white blood cells is through blood tests. However, this new device will help doctors spot life-threatening infections in cancer patients remotely, according to MIT. According to MIT, rather than drawing blood, this device uses light to look through the skin at the top of the fingernail and artificial intelligence to analyse and detect when WBCs reach dangerously low levels. "Some of the physicians that we have talked to are very excited because they think future versions of our product could be used to personalise the dose of chemotherapy given to each patient," said Leuko co-founder and CEO Carlos Castro-Gonzalez, a former postdoctorate at MIT. "If a patient is not becoming neutropenic, that could be a sign that you could increase the dose. Then every treatment could be based on how each patient is individually reacting," he added. The technology was first developed by researchers at MIT in 2015. Over the next few years, they created a prototype and conducted a small study to validate their approach. In a study of 44 patients in 2019, Leuko's team showed the approach was able to detect when WBC levels dropped below a critical threshold with minimal false positives. The company has been working with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over the last four years to design studies confirming their device is accurate and easy to use by untrained patients, MIT said. Later this year, they expect to begin a pivotal study that will be used to register for FDA approval. Also Read: Lucknow hospital surgically treats ‘suicide disease’ This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

16 June,2024 03:39 PM IST | Mumbai | IANS
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Lucknow hospital surgically treats ‘suicide disease’

Balrampur Hospital in Lucknow has become the first district hospital to offer surgical treatment for Trigeminal Neuralgia, also known as the suicide disease (mainly because of the high-level pain that the patient suffers). This achievement follows the successful operation of Ashok Kumar, 46, who was suffering from the condition. The patient had to spend merely Rs 400 for the surgery. Bollywood star Salman Khan also had this disease. Trigeminal neuralgia affects about 10-12 out of 100,000 people and is more frequently found in women. Ashok was experiencing severe pain on the right side of his face for six years. Despite using painkillers and undergoing treatments since the age of 40, he found no relief. Later, considering his financial constraints, some persons recommended him to visit Balrampur Hospital. Ashok sought help from Dr Vinod Tiwari, a neurosurgeon at Balrampur Hospital. Dr Tiwari noted that Kumar’s right facial pain was triggered by minor activities such as wind, brushing his teeth, gargling, eating, drinking water, or a light touch on his right cheek, causing him hours of excruciating pain. “I told him if it is not cured by medicines, then surgery is the only solution,” said Dr Tiwari. Further, MRI scan revealed that an artery was compressing the fifth nerve on the right side of Kumar’s brain, leading to unbearable pain. The medical team decided to perform surgery to relieve the compression and ease the patient’s suffering. “I and my team at Balrampur Hospital decided to perform the surgery to remove the tumour and decompress the nerve,” Dr Tiwari explained. The operation, which took over three hours under general anaesthesia, was successful. Ashok is currently recovering in ICU ward. The patient can speak normally and is no longer experiencing pain, Dr Tiwari said. Dr Pawan Kumar, Chief Superintendent at Balrampur Hospital, said: “Due to this disease, the patient is at risk of paralysis due to brain pressure. This story has been sourced from a third party syndicated feed, agencies. Mid-day accepts no responsibility or liability for its dependability, trustworthiness, reliability and data of the text. Mid-day management/mid-day.com reserves the sole right to alter, delete or remove (without notice) the content in its absolute discretion for any reason whatsoever

16 June,2024 02:41 PM IST | Mumbai | IANS
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How this Mumbai-based Parsi couple beat obesity to lead healthy lives again

Parsi couple Kaynaz and Perseus Ghista were struggling with obesity and its associated health issues. However, their path to wellness not only transformed their physical health but also profoundly impacted their personal and professional lives by showcasing the profound impact of bariatric surgery in their journey. The wife’s journeyIn 2017, Kaynaz, weighing 126 kg, sought the expertise of Dr Ramen Goel, bariatric & metabolic surgeon, Wockhardt Hospitals, Mumbai Central. Her weight had been a source of numerous health issues, including joint pain, high blood pressure, and an overall decline in her quality of life. The decision to undergo bariatric surgery was driven by the desire to reclaim her health and vitality. Surgery and recovery She underwent gastric bypass surgery, a procedure known for its effectiveness in significant weight loss and improvement in obesity-related conditions. The surgery was successful, and over the course of a year, she experienced a remarkable transformation, shedding weight and regaining her health. Six years post-surgery, she now weighs 94 kg. Dr Goel commenting on her progress said, “Kaynaz's dedication to following the post-surgery guidelines and making lifestyle changes was truly commendable. It’s always inspiring to see patients transform their lives in such a significant way.” Life after surgery The weight loss brought about a dramatic change in her lifestyle. Activities that were once a struggle became part of her daily routine. Her energy levels soared, allowing her to engage more actively with her family and friends. Professionally, she found a new level of confidence, which was reflected in her work performance and relationships with colleagues. Reflecting on her journey, Kaynaz commented, “I feel like a completely new person. I can participate in activities with my family and friends without feeling exhausted. My job performance has improved, and I feel more confident every day.” The husband’s journeyInspired by his wife's success, Perseus, who weighed 156 kg, decided to follow suit a year later. His obesity had led to severe sleep apnea, a condition that affected his breathing during sleep. Surgery and a smooth recoveryDr Goel performed a similar bariatric procedure on Perseus. Due to his sleep apnea, the team needed to be especially attentive, but their skill and careful monitoring ensured everything went smoothly. Perseus came through the operation safely and began his journey to better health. Dr Goel added, “His case was particularly challenging due to his severe sleep apnea. We had to act swiftly to manage his oxygen levels during surgery. Thankfully, everything went well, and he made a full recovery.” Recovery and transformation Post-surgery, the husband’s recovery was closely monitored. Over the next six years, he experienced a profound transformation, with his weight dropping to 87 kg.  Sharing his experience, Perseus said, “The surgery was a turning point in my life. Not only did I lose weight, but my sleep apnea also improved drastically. I feel healthier and more energetic than I have in years.” Beyond weight loss Family and relationships The couple’s journey transcends mere numbers on a scale. The weight loss brought about a renewed sense of hope and happiness in their lives. They began to engage in more family activities, and their relationship strengthened as they supported each other through the process. The bond with their extended family and friends also improved as they could participate more actively in social gatherings and events. The wife reflects on their relationship, “We’ve grown closer through this journey. Supporting each other through the ups and downs has strengthened our bond.” Professional impact Both the husband and wife experienced a boost in their professional lives. The wife’s newfound confidence translated into better job performance and opportunities for career advancement. The husband, too, found that his improved health allowed him to work more efficiently and with greater enthusiasm. Overall well-being Today, the couple leads a healthy and fulfilling life. They are living testimonials to the positive impacts of bariatric surgery. Their story is a testament to the fact that weight loss surgery is not just about losing weight but about gaining a new lease on life. It’s about overcoming health challenges, strengthening personal relationships, and achieving professional goals. Their story is a perfect example of how bariatric surgery can change lives. It’s not just about the physical transformation, but the overall improvement in quality of life. I’m proud to have been a part of their journey. This journey underscores the profound human impact of weight loss surgery, highlighting how such medical interventions can bring about positive 

15 June,2024 02:25 PM IST | Mumbai | mid-day online correspondent
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