shot-button
Subscription Subscription
Home > News > India News > Article > Maharashtra Onion prices fall by Rs 150 per quintal at Lasalgaon

Maharashtra: Onion prices fall by Rs 150 per quintal at Lasalgaon

Updated on: 20 February,2024 10:05 PM IST  |  Nashik
mid-day online correspondent |

Onion prices fell by Rs 150 per quintal at Lasalgaon mandi in Nashik of Maharashtra after the government announcement that the ban on exports of the bulb will continue till March 31

Maharashtra: Onion prices fall by Rs 150 per quintal at Lasalgaon

Representational Pic/File

Onion prices on Tuesday fell by Rs 150 per quintal at Lasalgaon mandi in Nashik district of Maharashtra after the government announcement that the ban on exports of the bulb will continue till March 31, reported the PTI.


Driven by reports of the lifting of the export ban on the commodity, the modal wholesale onion prices shot up 40.62 per cent to Rs 1,800 per quintal on February 19 in Lasalgaon, the country's largest wholesale onion market, from Rs 1,280 per quintal on February 17, as per the PTI.


However, on Tuesday the prices eased by Rs 150 per quintal to an average price of Rs 1,650 per quintal with 8,500 quintal onions auctioned.


"The prices increased a bit last week, however, with no government resolution (GR) or announcement about the lifting of the ban on onion exports, these have stabilised," Lasalgaon APMC chairman Balasaheb Kshirsagar told PTI.

Earlier in the day, Consumer Affairs Secretary Rohit Kumar Singh told PTI that the "ban on onion exports has not been lifted. It is in force and there is no change in the status."

The government's supreme priority is to ensure enough domestic availability of onion at reasonable prices to consumers, he added.

Ahead of general elections, the ban is unlikely to be lifted even after March 31 as rabi (winter) onion production is expected to be lower due to less coverage of area, especially in Maharashtra, sources said.

In the 2023 rabi season, onion production was estimated to be at 22.7 million tonnes.

The Agriculture Ministry officials will assess the rabi onion coverage in key growing states of Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat in the coming days.

The export of onions to friendly countries is allowed on a case-to-case basis after approval from the inter-ministerial group.

The ban on export of onion will continue till its previously announced deadline of March 31 as the government is keen to keep prices under check and ensure domestic availability, a top official said on Tuesday, as per PTI.

On December 8, 2023, the government had banned export of onion till March 31.

"Ban on onion exports has not been lifted. It is in force and there is no change in the status," Consumer Affairs Secretary Rohit Kumar Singh told PTI.

The government's supreme priority is to ensure enough domestic availability of onion at reasonable prices to consumers, he added.

Ahead of general elections, the ban is unlikely to be lifted even after March 31 as rabi (winter) onion production is expected to be lower due to less coverage of area especially in Maharasthra, sources said.

In the 2023 rabi season, onion production was estimated to be at 22.7 million tonnes.

The Agriculture Ministry officials will assess the rabi onion coverage in key growing states of Maharsthra, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat in the coming days.

(with PTI inputs)

"Exciting news! Mid-day is now on WhatsApp Channels Subscribe today by clicking the link and stay updated with the latest news!" Click here!

Do you agree with the government`s decision to not make any changes relating to taxation?

Register for FREE
to continue reading !

This is not a paywall.
However, your registration helps us understand your preferences better and enables us to provide insightful and credible journalism for all our readers.

Mid-Day Web Stories

Mid-Day Web Stories

This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK