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Dudhwa Tiger Reserve mahouts will now record their experiences to help understand elephants better

Updated on: 14 August,2022 06:01 PM IST  |  Lakhimpur Kheri (Uttar Pradesh)
IANS |

Chief conservator of forests and field director, Sanjay Kumar Pathak has decided to document the experiences of these veteran mahouts so that not only the park authorities but other mahouts also benefit

Dudhwa Tiger Reserve mahouts will now record their experiences to help understand elephants better

Image for representational purpose only. Photo Courtesy: istock


Elephants and mahouts are known to have a very special and close relationship especially because the latter takes care of the animal and spend most of their time with each other. In an attempt to help understand the behaviour of elephants better, the mahouts of Dudhwa Tiger Reserve will now share their experience of handling the pachyderms with the authorities for help in the future. 

Chief conservator of forests and field director, Dudhwa Tiger Reserve (DTR), Sanjay Kumar Pathak has asked mahouts of Dudhwa Tiger reserve (DTR) to share their experiences while handling elephants in order to create an offline record of their knowledge.


Pathak said, "Mahouts are always very close to their elephants, keeping tabs on their movement, health, behaviour and even on their sentiments and response to circumstances. Even elephants, who follow the commands of their mahouts, develop an emotional bonding with them."

He further said that only a mahout can describe how an elephant under him responded to the presence of a big carnivore in a jungle or how they behaved while engaged in an operation during man-animal conflict, etc.


Pathak said when he took charge of Dudhwa as field director in 2020, he decided to document the experiences of these veteran mahouts so that not only the park authorities but other mahouts also benefit.

"The outbreak of Covid-19 affected the process, but this year, we are making an offline record of mahouts' experiences," Pathak said.

Also Read: 'As policies improve, human-elephant conflict worsens'

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