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Home > Mumbai Guide News > Things To Do News > Article > Indian musicians dissect Angry by The Rolling Stones before their new album Hackney Diamonds is out

Indian musicians dissect 'Angry' by The Rolling Stones before their new album 'Hackney Diamonds' is out

Updated on: 18 September,2023 08:09 AM IST  |  Mumbai
Shriram Iyengar | shriram.iyengar@mid-day.com

As The Rolling Stones come out with their first album in 18 years, we speak to rock and indie musicians about their first new single, Angry

Indian musicians dissect 'Angry' by The Rolling Stones before their new album 'Hackney Diamonds' is out

(From left) Charlie Watts, Mick Jagger, Ronnie Wood and Keith Richards at a rehearsal. Pics Courtesy/Instagram

They broke through when Elvis was still king. They even outlasted Queen Elizabeth II. Set to release in October, Hackney Diamonds, is The Rolling Stones’ first collection of new songs in 18 years, and features the trio of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, alongside new addition Steve Jordan who replaced their late drummer Charlie Watts.


Actress Sydney Sweeney in a still from the music video for AngryActress Sydney Sweeney in a still from the music video for Angry



The first single from the album, Angry, which released on September 6 is embedded with the brash zest and musical groove that defines the band. To understand the new Stones, we reached out to musicians and Indian rock veterans to share their take.


Log on to Angry by The Rolling Stones on Spotify; YouTube

There is life in the old dogs yet

Subir Malik, frontman and founder, Parikrama

I loved [the song]. It sounds like a classic. There are no techno or hip-hop elements to the track. The song is charged up. The guitar is like a break riff, and then the drum comes in. I am glad they have stuck to the similar tones that makes them recognisable.

They have been around for 50 odd years now, and recently lost Charlie Watts. Like ACDC and a couple of old timers — including ourselves at Parikrama — when the chips are down, we come up with something stellar. All I can say is that you can’t underestimate old bones. We still have a lot of  rock and roll left in us. 

Subir Malik, frontman and founder, Parikrama

Stands out with simplicity

Sarthak Karkare, vocalist, Maqta and St.Cyril

When I heard it for the first time, I thought it was very much in the glam rock space. What caught my attention was the drums. It harked back to the Queen’s drum production with its roomy sounds. I think the simplicity of the drum groove also resonated with me. The guitars were sparse but did the job really well. They gave Jagger’s vocals the necessary space. The production on the track is interesting, since the sounds were different to everything they had done in the past. If this song is any indication of the album, I am pretty excited about it.

Sarthak Karkare, vocalist, Maqta and St.Cyril

A modern rock number

Sanyanth Naroth, songwriter and vocalist, Easy Wanderlings

Honestly, I am not a big fan of The Stones. But I have heard more than enough tracks to recognise their signature from the first riff. At the same time, it is impossible not to respect them for continuing to do what they do. Listening to The Stones is one of the rituals of teenage rebellion. The song is clearly their work. The production sounds like a modern rock ballad. It is stylish, and has a vibe that makes you want to rock. Thankfully, unlike many bands, they did not try and do something radically different.

Sanyanth Naroth, songwriter and vocalist, Easy Wanderlings

Wait for the whole album

Gary Lawyer, singer

I did listen to the single, but not enough to pass judgement on it. I am definitely looking forward to their whole album because their last one [Bigger Bang] was superb. The song has a very driving rock and roll feel, typical of The Stones. You need to spend time with their music to really gauge them. I am a huge fan. I can picture myself in school hearing Satisfaction and getting hooked on it. The kind of rhythm guitar that Richards plays [in the song] is very typical, and Jagger’s delivery is, of course, the kind only Jagger can do.

Gary Lawyer, singer

Enjoy it as a legacy

Girish Pradhan, vocalist, Girish And The Chronicles

I am not looking at the song from a musical perspective, but as a legacy. It is a privilege for us that they are still putting out music. I thought the song had a riff that I can relate to. It felt like the Rolling Stones with a modern mix. This is a rare opportunity. The album should be taken as a privilege rather than being analysed or criticised. At the end of the day, they are pioneers in the field.

Girish Pradhan, vocalist, Girish And The Chronicles

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